From sick leave to salon?

#1
Hello geeks :)
So I’ve been home from my regular office job for a couple of months now. Exhaustion syndrome as a result of mad work environment and health problems last year. I’m very slowly recovering and hope to be able to start working again, however hopefully at another job as the situation at my current one is getting worse.
I’m now in the textile industry but would love to start working as a nail tech (certified since June this year). Doing nails is the only thing during this rough period that has felt fun and motivating me.
I have been doing nails for friends and family now, and have enough equipment and products to work professionally as self employed. However I do feel like I don’t have enough experience and drive to start up my own business atm, but I’m also worried working in a salon could be too hectic :(
Any advice would be super appreciated. Does it even sound realistic to start over with a new job in a new business after being quite ill and sensitive to stress?? I live in Sweden which has pretty good regulations around rehab, could I ask a salon to have me for a couple of hours/week (gov funded), or would it just be considered space to waste?
Xx
 

#2
You should consider working from home.
 

#3
You should consider working from home.
I would really love to do that. Unfortunately I live a bit secluded but going mobile could be an option. Thank you for your input! Xx
 

Bel's Gels

Qualified Nail Technician
#4
Clients can be stressful and also fickle.
Each profession has its pros and cons.
 

TheDuchess

Well-Known Member
#5
Stress is quite a personal issue. I would assume that you will benefit from a change of career that allows you the flexibility to control your schedule and choose the work that you do.

I think that work experience in a salon is an excellent idea. Yes, at times it will feel stressful, you may be asked to do treatments before you feel sufficiently experienced, or you might be under time pressure, but this pressure will be shared with your employer - you can't take ownership of all the stress, no matter how much you may feel that it's all on you in these situations. I would say that these experiences will help you to build stress resilience and to stress test yourself.

You might find working in a salon exhausting - but if you are doing it for work experience that would feel different to joinng a salon as a new career. Don't work full time, give yourself enough time off to rest and reflect on your day. Keep a reflective journal and look back and comment on your learning points.

I retrained after an extensive period of ill health and I had similar anxieties when I was placed in a busy Spa for 12 weeks. I was alarmed and concerned to be "dumped" into treatments when there was no certainty that I would be able to achieve the standard expected. However, mostly my treatment standard was good enough which helped to build my confidence. When I was struggling - this was noticed due to the time I was taking. On those occasions someone would check in with me and help - maybe by taking over (my waxing was poor) or by checking and affirming my work and then engaging with the client - reassuring the client that my work was good. I enjoyed the feeling of achievement when I got through these stressful moments and I started to feel much more relaxed. I realised that I was working to professional standards and that even professionals feel inexperienced at times. There is always something to learn and new clients all have their individual challenges.

I was booked in for treatments gradually, so initially just one treatment in the morning, one in the afternoon, gradually building up to 2 hour blocks of varied treatment time and then 4 hours and eventually 7 hours with a one hour break. So I began with lots of warning so I could set up and prepare myself, and I ended taking whatever was booked - or even stepping in to cover other treatments at the last minute.

I also really enjoyed doing mundane tasks like laundry, folding towels, tidying the stock cupboard or cleaning trolleys and I found these "escape" activities enabled me to rest whenever I found the environment too much. There were lots of occasions when things didn't go well, there were misunderstandings and small injustices - this is the nature of working with other people. I realised that this environment was not right for me - but good for me in small doses. I wasn't well enough to work even part time for 2-3 days a week, but I did manage 3 days work experience for 8-10 weeks and I learned enough to set me up for my own business.

Good luck and fingers crossed for you
 

#6
Clients can be stressful and also fickle.
Each profession has its pros and cons.
Thanks for your reply! I’m hoping to be able to gain a bit more experience before doing any change, on friends etc., try to get back to everyone for an honest evaluation (but still under less pressure than with a complete stranger) and by that be a bit more prepared for difficult clients.
 

#7
Stress is quite a personal issue. I would assume that you will benefit from a change of career that allows you the flexibility to control your schedule and choose the work that you do.

I think that work experience in a salon is an excellent idea. Yes, at times it will feel stressful, you may be asked to do treatments before you feel sufficiently experienced, or you might be under time pressure, but this pressure will be shared with your employer - you can't take ownership of all the stress, no matter how much you may feel that it's all on you in these situations. I would say that these experiences will help you to build stress resilience and to stress test yourself.

You might find working in a salon exhausting - but if you are doing it for work experience that would feel different to joinng a salon as a new career. Don't work full time, give yourself enough time off to rest and reflect on your day. Keep a reflective journal and look back and comment on your learning points.

I retrained after an extensive period of ill health and I had similar anxieties when I was placed in a busy Spa for 12 weeks. I was alarmed and concerned to be "dumped" into treatments when there was no certainty that I would be able to achieve the standard expected. However, mostly my treatment standard was good enough which helped to build my confidence. When I was struggling - this was noticed due to the time I was taking. On those occasions someone would check in with me and help - maybe by taking over (my waxing was poor) or by checking and affirming my work and then engaging with the client - reassuring the client that my work was good. I enjoyed the feeling of achievement when I got through these stressful moments and I started to feel much more relaxed. I realised that I was working to professional standards and that even professionals feel inexperienced at times. There is always something to learn and new clients all have their individual challenges.

I was booked in for treatments gradually, so initially just one treatment in the morning, one in the afternoon, gradually building up to 2 hour blocks of varied treatment time and then 4 hours and eventually 7 hours with a one hour break. So I began with lots of warning so I could set up and prepare myself, and I ended taking whatever was booked - or even stepping in to cover other treatments at the last minute.

I also really enjoyed doing mundane tasks like laundry, folding towels, tidying the stock cupboard or cleaning trolleys and I found these "escape" activities enabled me to rest whenever I found the environment too much. There were lots of occasions when things didn't go well, there were misunderstandings and small injustices - this is the nature of working with other people. I realised that this environment was not right for me - but good for me in small doses. I wasn't well enough to work even part time for 2-3 days a week, but I did manage 3 days work experience for 8-10 weeks and I learned enough to set me up for my own business.

Good luck and fingers crossed for you
Thank you for your thorough reply, and sharing your experience! I do believe I’d love to do all that type of mundane stuff, or just sit at the front desk and handle bookings. Just to get a bit of insight on how salon work would be.

If doing actual services, I suppose I’d do it at a trainee level which hopefully would take some stress off (although I assume many clients expect the exact same level of treatment as an experienced tech, but to a far lower price...).

Change of scenery would probably be beneficial to me, I’ve been working in textile for more than 10 years and with the industry doing poorly most environments would be rather stressful. I would really love to try what you did, just working a couple of hours a few days a week and maybe later be able to set up my own business. I hope you’re doing well now and want to thank you again for sharing your story, it’s very inspiring to me! Xx
 

TheDuchess

Well-Known Member
#8
You're very welcome Ongen. Keep checking in and reading threads - you'll gain great insight into the realities of the industry and learn a lot for the future when you may have your own business.

Personally, I've found my way back to much better health. I'm not classed as "well" but I think I give the impression that I am functioning normally. I am certainly happy and fulfilled.

I've found that clients are often very encouraging to students - especially if they are getting a discounted price (everyone likes a deal). There will be a few tricky experiences, but you can remind yourself that you're still learning and not take it too much to heart.

Reception work combines very well with nails. I'd say it would be a winning combination. Actually it's how I started (I'd forgotten). After my Spa placement I did work experience in a salon as receptionist. Just half a day a week at first and then increasing. I was very good at turning telephone enquiries into booked treatments and as I didn't like to turn away a walk-in enquiry, I'd often do a manicure.

All the best xx
 

#9
You're very welcome Ongen. Keep checking in and reading threads - you'll gain great insight into the realities of the industry and learn a lot for the future when you may have your own business.

Personally, I've found my way back to much better health. I'm not classed as "well" but I think I give the impression that I am functioning normally. I am certainly happy and fulfilled.

I've found that clients are often very encouraging to students - especially if they are getting a discounted price (everyone likes a deal). There will be a few tricky experiences, but you can remind yourself that you're still learning and not take it too much to heart.

Reception work combines very well with nails. I'd say it would be a winning combination. Actually it's how I started (I'd forgotten). After my Spa placement I did work experience in a salon as receptionist. Just half a day a week at first and then increasing. I was very good at turning telephone enquiries into booked treatments and as I didn't like to turn away a walk-in enquiry, I'd often do a manicure.

All the best xx
Thank you so much! I’m happy to hear you’re feeling better. I go through this forum on a daily basis and love it, keeps the dream alive
I think it’s time to start work training soon, and hopefully I can do that in a salon. I’ll keep all your notes in mind, so helpful. Xx
 
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