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Inconsistencies within the industry

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naturalnails

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A while back in the chat room one night we were discussing the fact we now had a stand alone NVQ qualification and we were debating whether this was a good idea or not - one of the things which came up was the question of whose standards would this be based on.

I was reading my Prof Nails magazine today and there is a "Tips on Technique" article which mentions the following:

1. Buff and blend - not a problem with this - adhere tip and blend.
2. Powder ball - At this stage you can cut the tip to a shorter length for comfort and ease of working. Apply liquid to the surface of the prepared nail only, and then having dipped your brush in the liquid again, pick up a ball of powder.
Surely this should not be acceptable practice.

This I understand to be a one ball method of application as no. 3 is about moving the product about to the cuticle and free edge.

Then:

4. Crete an arch - dip your flat manicure tool into the liquid and push each of the sides and then take it from side to side across the nail, creating an arch. The product will still be pliable and your tool can create your C very easily. Repeat this on all nails.
I know that we are all taught differently but surely the fundamentals of product ratio should be across the board and not to use liquid without powder etc.

Then I purchased an NVQ text book 2003 version which describes


"Artificial Nails" - there are three different techniques which may be used, namely false nails, nail extensions and nail sculptures.
False nails being the full glued on ones the like of which you can buy in Boots etc but done in the salon.

Nail Extensions are done with a plastic tip and overlayed with gel.

Nail sculptures are semi-permanent nails made from a mixture of powder and liquid acrylic.

I thought I had a handle on this nails lark but the more I read the more confused I get LOL.

What hope is there for new and old (like me LOL) techs as well as for the consumers if there is such a huge difference in techniques.

This one will run and run I think. LOL
 

mum

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Hi Fiona

What you have discovered has been a very big 'bee in my bonnet' for many years!!! I was about to type that I could write a text book on it but I have already and the second one is due out soon.

I wrote an article for one of the mags (Scratch I think) recently about this very subject with several examples of things that are being taught in colleges and training centres. (e.g. stand acetone in BOILING water for removal!?)

Unfortunately, it is a problem that has been around for years and stems from 2 main areas: firstly, there are not enough qualified and experienced teachers in the education area and many of them have done a short course with little or no real experience in a working salon; secondly, a lot of the 'facts' and techniques taught are based on brand techniques or marketing stories rather than real facts.

If you start to look into the situation in any depth is is very scary and so obvious why artificial nails gets such bad press.

I really could write an epic on this subject but all I can really say is that the best place to start for factual information for technicians are the books approved by HABIA (they wrote and own the Occupational Standards).

The only ones that are approved are The Encyclopedia of Nails, The Complete Nail Technician (second, bigger edition due out in the summer) and Nail Artistry. (Yes, I know one is mine for all you doubters out there, but you don't get rich writing a text book!)

When the basics are thoroughy learnt then it is time to move onto brand techniques (no different from hairdrerssing and beauty)

I also must add that, from an unbiased view, the info on the Designer Nails website regarding NVQ is excellent.

It is scary and it is up to the industry to question who is doing the teaching and are they suitably qualified. In many cases the answer is definately, yes! But in many, many other cases the answer is definately NO!

Marian (Newman)
 

sambam

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hiya!

i read that article too. i couldnt believe it! it also says brush the excess product with liquid only. im sure im right in thinking that using liquid alone can lead to over exposure = allergic reaction in time, ;) so like you said, why isnt everyone taught the same? :confused:
 

Jane

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Yes all that after you get your clients hands out of the autoclave having "sterilised" the nails first!
 

lyrali

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I've been reading this article too.
I thought maybe that it was some new kind of system being as it said to brush the nail with liquid :eek:
Also ... the bit toward the end where it tells you to 'cut the tip to desired length'... Ive never seen a tip cut AFTER application! Hmmm!!!
 

naturalnails

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lyrali said:
I've been reading this article too.
I thought maybe that it was some new kind of system being as it said to brush the nail with liquid :eek:
Also ... the bit toward the end where it tells you to 'cut the tip to desired length'... Ive never seen a tip cut AFTER application! Hmmm!!!
This is actually a standard NSI technique as they say it cuts down on filing and shaping - you only need do it once. But it is alot harder to file through product and tip to get the shape correct, I think.
 

diesel1978

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Hi All
I trained with NSI at college years ago and the way it was describd in the mag was as we were taught and as was stated if i remember correctly in the instruction sheets courtesy of NSI. Although i never had a problem with NSI i never ever did the liquid smoothing method as within the 1st week at college using this technique i developed an allergic reaction beneath my free edge and all around the cuticles.....even now if i get any monomer of any brand on to this area it affects it!! Luckily i have nice natural nails anyway so don't need enhancements!!
Most systems have different techniques, and yes we may not approve of them...but i like to think of myself as lucky to be able to use a fantastic product and fantastic teaching methods that go along with it!!!
 

mum

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All these replies seem to be saying the same thing: it is brand technique training and techs need to have a good basic understanding first of what they are doing and why. It doesn't have to be wrong as long as users understand

Marian
 

Mrs Geek

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Jane said:
Yes all that after you get your clients hands out of the autoclave having "sterilised" the nails first!
:D :biggrin: :biggrin: :biggrin: :biggrin: :biggrin: :biggrin: How many times have we been saying SANITIZE NOT sterilize - we can only keep on keepin' on....
 

naturalnails

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mum said:
All these replies seem to be saying the same thing: it is brand technique training and techs need to have a good basic understanding first of what they are doing and why. It doesn't have to be wrong as long as users understand

Marian
Marian,

to a certain extent I agree with you but surely if we learn the fundamentals through college for instance - whose fundamentals are we to learn - etch the nail with a 100 grit file or remove shine with a 240 grit file - to use monomer on its own or not to use monomer on its own.

Until the brand companies agree on some basics then what use are the fundamentals taught by generics.

BTW - I searched through all 12 of my Scratch mags to find the article you wrote and read it with interest.
 

debbienailz

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naturalnails said:
Marian,


BTW - I searched through all 12 of my Scratch mags to find the article you wrote and read it with interest.
hi fiona
which edition was it in ?
thanks
debbie
 

talented talons

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Hi all, have to say i'm glad i found this post. When i read that article in the mag i suddenly thought, " I'm sure i was taught NOT to use liquid only on the nail for fear of over exposure." Plus i'm sure it then effects your ratio so makes the mix too wet which can cause shrinkage and lifting.

Being a new tech myself i find it can get very confusing but i'm glad that Marian has said about the "complete nail technician " book and "the encyclopedia of nails" book. Both have been my bible of late as they go into alot of detail with product use and chemistry etc. Without them i think i would have made alot of mistakes along the way.

Thanks again all you fellow Geeks, you are such a life saver to me:D
 

mum

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Hi Talented Talons
I am pleased that if nothing else it made you think.

The point I want to make is that an understanding of all processes is the most important issue. I don't want to comment on company training and brand techniques as there are too many to know about but as long as an understanding of what is happening along with all the implications is taught then that's fine. An educated technician can make up their own mind on the various techniques.

Not all teachers get it right which is why reference/text books are useful.

I have just heard about a college lecturer say when asked about a green nail that is is an allergic reaction to the glue!!!!!!! Oh dear

Marian
 

naturalnails

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debbienailz said:
hi fiona
which edition was it in ?
thanks
debbie
Debbie,

April 2004 page 51.
 

debbienailz

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naturalnails said:
Debbie,

April 2004 page 51.
cheers fiona


debbie
 
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