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Infilling with glue?

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Tracysnails

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I was talking with my hairdresser last week and she mentioned she had 'took up nails'. She asked me about how I infill (l&p) clients, do I use l&p or glue :?: :?: :?:

I was taught to infill with l&p and my (very good) tutor never mentioned using glue, anyone else heard of this method? If so, how does it work? :? Myself I would have thought it would have increased the chances of a bacterial infection but someone please correct me if I'm wrong :)

Thanks! Just curious!
 

*Glynis*

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I was trained with Backscratchers. I specialize in fibreglass and silk extensions.

During the first two week infill you use just the resin (I was told no end of times on the course not to call it glue!!!). On a customer's third visit (another two weeks later) I infill with resin and fibreglass/silk.

This might be the system your hairdresser was referring to.
 

geeg

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Infilling with Glue (?????) adhesive on a L&P nail??

Now what does that really sound like to you eh?

Yes, it could be done but think of what would happen to the enhancement down the line ... layers of different products, some that break down more easily than others, different densities, .....

Come on, this is one of those 'short cut' shoddy methods that we have been talking about on other threads ....

Leave it alone and stick to what you know is the right way to do your system.
 

The Geek

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Tracysnails said:
Myself I would have thought it would have increased the chances of a bacterial infection but someone please correct me if I'm wrong :)
nope. youre not wrong... you are 100% correct. This is a technique to try to hide areas of lift that were not properly removed by the tech.
Since you can't get into the area of lift to prep or sanitize it... the chances that you will have long term adhesion is very small and the chances for a bacterial infection are very high.

hope this helps ;)
 

Tracysnails

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this is one of those 'short cut' shoddy methods
Hhhmmm, thought so but wanted to keep an open mind till I checked with the experts ;) .

youre not wrong... you are 100% correct
:goal: At last, things I'm learning on this board are going in :thumbsup: :oops:
 
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