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Polygel allergies

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Jilliam

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Was so keen to post this solution, - I'm a City and Guilds qualified beautician, requirements pretty stringent back in the day but that's not my profession now. Have always applied nail tips for myself , painted with gel varnish and cured but were never too strong and often broke, - my own nails are pretty weak and poor :( , then discovered Polygel and used with nail forms, - wow! great strong nails and looked fab until the allergic reactions, chronic itching, soggy nail bed under the nail form which didn't seem to grow, and even black mould growing under one!!, ...devastated. Tried everything, paid a fortune for hypoallergenic Swiss product but nothing worked.After a lot of pain and frustration I've worked it out, ...this stuff should not be in contact with the skin at all and certainly not close to a short nail, - so went back to plan A, fitted a nail tip, filed it down making sure it covered all exposed skin at the corners and and nail tip. Then buffed and applied a coat of gel builder, - keeping it away from skin, then usual prep procedure and then the Polygel and nail form. Use a nail dust vac, scrub away residue after final procedure , any concerns or close contact areas apply "skin glove" type barriers, I think Avon, - even Screwfix do one, - so got my talons back after months of grief!, - just don't let that stuff or dust from it get near your skin or nail bed, - hope this helps! :)
 

Trinity

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Was so keen to post this solution, - I'm a City and Guilds qualified beautician, requirements pretty stringent back in the day but that's not my profession now. Have always applied nail tips for myself , painted with gel varnish and cured but were never too strong and often broke, - my own nails are pretty weak and poor :( , then discovered Polygel and used with nail forms, - wow! great strong nails and looked fab until the allergic reactions, chronic itching, soggy nail bed under the nail form which didn't seem to grow, and even black mould growing under one!!, ...devastated. Tried everything, paid a fortune for hypoallergenic Swiss product but nothing worked.After a lot of pain and frustration I've worked it out, ...this stuff should not be in contact with the skin at all and certainly not close to a short nail, - so went back to plan A, fitted a nail tip, filed it down making sure it covered all exposed skin at the corners and and nail tip. Then buffed and applied a coat of gel builder, - keeping it away from skin, then usual prep procedure and then the Polygel and nail form. Use a nail dust vac, scrub away residue after final procedure , any concerns or close contact areas apply "skin glove" type barriers, I think Avon, - even Screwfix do one, - so got my talons back after months of grief!, - just don't let that stuff or dust from it get near your skin or nail bed, - hope this helps! :)
I think you're preaching to the choir, we're always telling people to keep products off the skin. It's not specifically the polygel products, it's all nail products.

Better training. Better understanding of the products involved. Correct matching of products and lamp. All the basics are so important
 
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Derpyvader

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Was so keen to post this solution, - I'm a City and Guilds qualified beautician, requirements pretty stringent back in the day but that's not my profession now. Have always applied nail tips for myself , painted with gel varnish and cured but were never too strong and often broke, - my own nails are pretty weak and poor :( , then discovered Polygel and used with nail forms, - wow! great strong nails and looked fab until the allergic reactions, chronic itching, soggy nail bed under the nail form which didn't seem to grow, and even black mould growing under one!!, ...devastated. Tried everything, paid a fortune for hypoallergenic Swiss product but nothing worked.After a lot of pain and frustration I've worked it out, ...this stuff should not be in contact with the skin at all and certainly not close to a short nail, - so went back to plan A, fitted a nail tip, filed it down making sure it covered all exposed skin at the corners and and nail tip. Then buffed and applied a coat of gel builder, - keeping it away from skin, then usual prep procedure and then the Polygel and nail form. Use a nail dust vac, scrub away residue after final procedure , any concerns or close contact areas apply "skin glove" type barriers, I think Avon, - even Screwfix do one, - so got my talons back after months of grief!, - just don't let that stuff or dust from it get near your skin or nail bed, - hope this helps! :)
Thanks for Taking the time to write this to remind us why it's so important to watch your steps through the process ! Im So glad to hear you found away to protect to keep doing what you loved !
 

Feline

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It’s hard isn’t it? Staying away from the free edge and skin folds is natural to us but so hard to not slip or accidentally do something that could cause allergy due to the exposure.

This is what I didn’t get about the acrylic dip system, which was just making its resurgence as I closed my business.

After everything I had learned in training about over exposure, how on earths crust is the dipping system void of creating issue?

I need the education on that one too, because until then.. I’ll never guide any person anywhere near it.
 

Trinity

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It’s hard isn’t it? Staying away from the free edge and skin folds is natural to us but so hard to not slip or accidentally do something that could cause allergy due to the exposure.
I don't think anyone can honestly say they've never slipped and touched skin, usually it's fidgety clients that cause it not us, but that's high unlikely to trigger an allergic reaction in an occasional accidental situation.

Over exposure takes repeated exposure to trigger...that's where this issue is based - poorly educated techs and DIYers repeatedly getting uncared products all over the skin.

It's so sad that clients think nails hurting after treatment is OK, or acceptable, they don't realise that stinging, throbbing, itching are not right, it's the start of a problem that needs addressing. Unfortunately it gets ignored and becomes worse and worse.
 

Feline

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I don't think anyone can honestly say they've never slipped and touched skin, usually it's fidgety clients that cause it not us, but that's high unlikely to trigger an allergic reaction in an occasional accidental situation.

Over exposure takes repeated exposure to trigger...that's where this issue is based - poorly educated techs and DIYers repeatedly getting uncared products all over the skin.

It's so sad that clients think nails hurting after treatment is OK, or acceptable, they don't realise that stinging, throbbing, itching are not right, it's the start of a problem that needs addressing. Unfortunately it gets ignored and becomes worse and worse.
True, it happens, and unless they are a long term client we can never underestimate how much exposure a client has had, wether they’ve been doing diy nails themselves etc, plus the added pressure of clients not always being honest when answering questions for record cards.

I can’t even begin to say how many people came to me with big filled up flooded cuticles of gel products 😱

It really isn’t the norm to have pain with these things, so sad that some people are told that it is - by their tech !!!x
 

Jilliam

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Never had any issues with gel curing nail polish at all, - maybe it's just Polygel, - anyway I keep it well away from nail edge with an applied nail tip first now, and works well :) , I'm not a hobbyist and am well qualified in dermatology , professional manicure etc, problem occurs applied to a short nail when the polygel has access close to the nail tip, even with correct nail prep procedure in advance.
 

jlsdds

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I’m sure that I can be spot on with application to my ‘off, less dominant’ hand, which is my left...but, doing the other hand is like trying to corral cats. (I’m from Texas, USA. Can’t be done without mishaps.)

Since I do have sensitivity to all products, save Shellac, I never attempt to do my own nails. The possibility of the resulting problems aren’t worth it.
 

Jilliam

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It's only Polygel that seems to give me a problem, even when cured and cleaned if part of the tip is resting /close to a part of my fingertip, - even the nail dust when filing causes irritation, - I really don't think it's usually down to any error on the part of the nail technician given that, though I do apply my own. Have been obsessed with sorting this issue, - I now use this Avon skin glove on all exposed skin prior to any nail application or filing, - it absorbs well, isn't greasy and problem's now gone!, - I'm sure there's similar stuff out there, , might just be good as a precaution with any client with a hint of sensitivity, - I do get the option of avoiding altogether is wise but was so disappointed as my natural nails are weak and pretty rubbish :( .
 

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Trinity

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What brand of Polygel are you using?
 

Jilliam

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Initially Blue Sky, - but then purchased a more expensive hypoallergenic brand Polytek, ..ultimately the reactions were the same.
 

Trinity

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Initially Blue Sky, - but then purchased a more expensive hypoallergenic brand Polytek, ..ultimately the reactions were the same.
Enough said, the rubbish ingredients in the BS have triggered the over exposure allergic reaction.

You need to visit a doctor to establish which specific ingredients you are allergic to, the issue is not nail products, going forward that particular ingredient may be in many other products including things like false teeth/implants, hip and knee replacement products, etc.

Repeatedly exposing yourself to products that trigger an allergic reaction is a rally bad idea, in the worst case scenario overexposure to histamine can cause anaphylaxis, which can lead to death.
 
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Jilliam

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No symptoms or problems now, - I'm ok but thanks for your comments, it's certainly something to keep an eye on!
 

BobSweden

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HI Jillian,
We do not claim that POLYTEK is hypoallergenic. However, because it does not contain HEMA, Hydroxypropyl Acrylate or acrylate acid, it is a much lower allergy risk that some other products on the market. It does contain Ethyl Methacrylate though, same as in EMA monomer. That is why we don't make the hypoallergenic claim for this.

It may be that you are allergic to EMA from before, or you immune system is so sensitive that now reacts to this.

Especially with this acrylgel products, it is really important that the product is correctly cured in the brands lamp. That's because acrylgel is so thick and high viscosity that it needs a lamp that has the correct brightness to cure.

Even then, a correct cure will mean only 90% is polymerised. That means there is still 10% reactive uncured ingredient. That can well be what your immune system is detecting.
 

Jilliam

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HI Jillian,
We do not claim that POLYTEK is hypoallergenic. However, because it does not contain HEMA, Hydroxypropyl Acrylate or acrylate acid, it is a much lower allergy risk that some other products on the market. It does contain Ethyl Methacrylate though, same as in EMA monomer. That is why we don't make the hypoallergenic claim for this.

It may be that you are allergic to EMA from before, or you immune system is so sensitive that now reacts to this.

Especially with this acrylgel products, it is really important that the product is correctly cured in the brands lamp. That's because acrylgel is so thick and high viscosity that it needs a lamp that has the correct brightness to cure.

Even then, a correct cure will mean only 90% is polymerised. That means there is still 10% reactive uncured ingredient. That can well be what your immune system is detecting.
Thanks Bob, yes I agree, I think I'm just hypersensitive now, would probably have been better starting with Polytek, but have never had any issues before, when I first changed to Polytek I had no problems, but then the reactions returned, as you say I think I was already hypersensitised by previous products used. I'm just super careful now with skin /nail end contact and all's ok!
 
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jlsdds

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I wore acrylic products for over 40 years. After over-exposure (hard gels) resulting in terrible skin problems which didn’t completely heal for 4 years, I decided that enough was really enough. I wouldn’t put on an acrylic, a hybrid acrylic or any gel polish other than Shellac, and that only rarely.

Clean, filed and manageably short is the ticket for me. No one has ever asked why my nails aren’t done. And my speed improved because I wasn’t constantly working around my own nails.

Growing up, my mom taught me to book a hair appointment with the person with the worst hair, because she was the one who was too busy to do her own and did all the other girls’ hair. Could hold true for nails, too.

Having my own nails ‘done’ just isn’t important considering all the sensitivity unknowns.
 

Jilliam

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Totally understand !, - I do my own nails and cut and colour my own hair too! :), regarding my nails, am not sure a salon could afford the time I use at the moment, - no Polygel at all is in contact with my skin or nail plate, - I apply a nailform tip first , then silicon skin barrier ,base builder gel and cure it before applying any Polygel product, so none is in contact with my skin or natural nails. My own nails have recovered well and are fine and healthy , - I can see this when I replace a broken applied one. After the initial time and attention to apply a new nail, these are easy to maintain and manage for me with no problems or pain, as for taking a client on with my issues, I'm not sure that would be viable financially or with given potential implications :(
 

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