Best type of massage for injured back?

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Planky1

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Hi All,

Last December I was in a car accident on the motorway, where a car hit in the back of us at 70mph. This exasperated an already bad back from a previous accident I had years ago.

I have been attending Physio for the past few months and my sessions come to an end next week. My back is still not good and when chatting with my physiotherapist she said that I would probably benefit from having regular massages to keep the muscles from seizing up again.

She isn't sure which type of massage would be of benefit, we discussed sports massage but she feels that this would be too deep and painful for me as I'm very sensitive and it's still very painful.

Could you help me decide on what I should be looking for, as I need to find someone in my area that can do this for me.

Many thanks
 

airendaie

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Have you tried hot stones or a similar heat massage? Like you I am quite sensitive and don't like deep massage. I love hot stones because your therapist doesn't have to use a lot of pressure (although they can if you need/want it), the heat itself helps to relax the muscles. I also find it really soothing so great if you're a bit stressed :)

Air x
 

cabby

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I would say hot stone as its gets very deep without having to put too much pressure. I have back problems from a prolapsed disc that caused permanent damage. The best I had on mine was acupuncture so why not give it a go. The next would be hot stone wish I could put my stones on myself but is a bit difficult lol xxx
 

jcpark

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You would be better to see a therapist who does remedial/sports massage. A spa type massage will be nice, but I suspect you want something that is effective and someone with the knowledge to treat you. Sports massage, provided you get someone properly qualified (level 4 and above) has moved on a lot since the days of being nothing but a painful, deep massage. Many techniques are quite gentle. The main difference will be that they will know what to do to produce results. Best thing would be to look on the CHNC register for a therapist.
 

Planky1

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Thank you. Not sure if Hot Stone would be beneficial as the muscles need work rather than just heat but not knowing about hot stone massage I'm not sure what is involved.

Sports Massage worries me a bit because I'm a complete wuss at the best of times, my back is so sore but if you say things have come on then perhaps I should look into this after all. Are there any other forms of massage that would be of benefit at all?

Thank you for your help ladies :hug:
 

Jewelady

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I would recommend hot stone massage definitely. The stones are used in the massage technique and this along with the heat works into the muscle better and deeper than just hands. Coupled with some pain relieving essential oils I think this could be what you need . You will be soooo relaxed too!!!
 

jcpark

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Sports Massage worries me a bit because I'm a complete wuss at the best of times, my back is so sore but if you say things have come on then perhaps I should look into this after all. Are there any other forms of massage that would be of benefit at all?
I think the difficulty will be finding the right therapist rather than the form of massage. Obviously you don't want an 'old school' sports therapist, although any worth going to will be doing CPD and should be up to date on new skills. A clinical/remedial therapist would also be good.

Where are you?



The stones are used in the massage technique and this along with the heat works into the muscle better and deeper than just hands
Sorry, no offence meant but I must disagree with this. While beneficial, heat from stones cannot replace skilled hands or the knowledge to work remedially. I do use hot stones, as do many remedial massage therapists, but it is not the same as a spa type hot stone massage, which, while a lovely treatment, will have limited benefit in providing relief.
 
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kazcasa

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I totally agree with JC, the advantage of a sports massage is that the therapist can release the muscle from origin to insertion. A great therapist should ALWAYS start with the minimum pressure needed (otherwise you spend half your time trying to relax muscles that you have caused to tense!)
For the record I also use hot stones and love them but use them in combination with my hands as thats what I trained to feel the injury.
Good luck.
 

jacqueline

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Stones are nice for relaxation and clients do enjoy them but as a massage therapist nothing beats working with or picking the muscle up with your hands and working with it, especially on an injured client. You can't feel anything with a stone and although the heat may be nice it won't have too much of a lasting affect. You need remedial massage.
 

celtica

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Definatly a remedial massage with a therapist who knows what they are doing and is experienced, if you are a bit worried about sports massage. Hot stones to me is just a spa massage and of no value to injury or trauma, although a pleasant enough massage.
 

aayspa

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Hi!

I completely sympathise with you here as I have been through the same thing.

I have to say I wouldn't recommend massage at all, I had several massages (spa, hot stone and sports) and although most of them were relaxing, none of them cured the problem. They gave relief for a day or 2 but then the pain came creeping back.

What sorted my back out after my accident was osteopathic treatment. Osteopaths are much better qualified than chiropractors so please be sure to find a good Osteopath. The treatments may be expensive and not the most relaxing but it will get to the source of the problem and solve it rather than disguise the pain. They use a variety of techniques including manipulation and massage but none will be painful to the point you want to jump off the couch.

Let me know how you get on!

Good Luck x
 

cabby

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I am qualified in hot stone and sports massage so when I do a hot stone I automatically do some sports as you can't help yourself when you find a problem. The heat will loosen the muscle first then you can release it. I still say the best thing I have ever had on my own personal back is acupuncture . I actually got mine on the national health from a referral from my doctor xxx
 

Planky1

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Thank you all so much for your replies. I've tried a chiropractor and osteopath before with no benefit but perhaps I didn't have someone good at what they do.

I will look into all options but remedial sports massage might be my first trial. I'm based in Northampton, I'll google and see who provides it with the training and qualifications you mention.

Thank you all again :hug:
 

NailsXpress

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Could I just ask? A colleague and her mother both have sports massages and after each treatment they are covered in bruises! Especially her mum she looks like she has been attacked! She won't be going on a beach for a while. They were told by the masseuse that it is normal. Is that right?
 

Lavender lovely

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Thank you. Not sure if Hot Stone would be beneficial as the muscles need work rather than just heat but not knowing about hot stone massage I'm not sure what is involved.

Sports Massage worries me a bit because I'm a complete wuss at the best of times, my back is so sore but if you say things have come on then perhaps I should look into this after all. Are there any other forms of massage that would be of benefit at all?

Thank you for your help ladies :hug:
If Hot Stone massage is applied correctly then it is not just heat - the muscles are worked the whole time - thats why it's a massage? It is a combination of holistic massage and using the stones to apply heat to certain areas, but also using hot stones to help make the muscle more pliable got massage, I use a combination of stone and hand work. It can also involve some seep tissue work using the stones, but you can ask the therapist to avoid this to suit your back problem. If you have a back problem I would definitely avoid sports massage. X
 

pinkfairy

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Could I just ask? A colleague and her mother both have sports massages and after each treatment they are covered in bruises! Especially her mum she looks like she has been attacked! She won't be going on a beach for a while. They were told by the masseuse that it is normal. Is that right?
No this is definitely not right! They may feel a bit achy after but they should not be bruised, especially not have numerous bruises!
I would advise them to find a new therapist, that is such an old fashioned approach to sports massage, putting so much pressure on the muscle that it bruises will cause the muscle to tense and the massage to have little benefit.
 

Dol

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Hi I would recommend an osteopath. My family and myself have had great results from assisting with breathing during asthma attacks to dealing with my youngest sons fractured skull and my broken leg.
 

BeautifyMe19

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If Hot Stone massage is applied correctly then it is not just heat - the muscles are worked the whole time - thats why it's a massage? It is a combination of holistic massage and using the stones to apply heat to certain areas, but also using hot stones to help make the muscle more pliable got massage, I use a combination of stone and hand work. It can also involve some seep tissue work using the stones, but you can ask the therapist to avoid this to suit your back problem. If you have a back problem I would definitely avoid sports massage. X
I totally agree with this.. the hot stones will warm tight muscles so the therapist can work more deeply, more quickly x
 

ginalhaytonxx

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I think a sports massage will be best as there are lots of different techniques that are tailored to suit your problem, I did a sports massage at college & used an infrared lamp on the area which had been injured (but not recent) to warm and relax the muscles before massaging it and my client found that this really improved how it felt, I'd give it a go or have a consultation with a sports massage therapist x
 

Lavender lovely

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Could I just ask? A colleague and her mother both have sports massages and after each treatment they are covered in bruises! Especially her mum she looks like she has been attacked! She won't be going on a beach for a while. They were told by the masseuse that it is normal. Is that right?
Gosh, if they have bruises then no, this isn't right as the geek above explains.

I was taught that bruises occurs during deep tissue when the muscle hasn't relaxed enough before applying a stroke or movement - therefore the therapist is rushing the technique. Gentle pressure is applied in one area without movement, and the therapist should then wait until the muscle gives and relaxes which can take a few minutes. When this happens then the muscle will actually do the work of movement, allowing the therapist to move through the muscle by giving - therefore there should be no 'pushing' or forcing the muscle. Slow and deep was the key I was taught , you can really hurt someone if you go to quickly with sports - you can ever go to deep but you CAN go to quick. This causes bruising. Hope this helps x
 

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