diabetics with dry cracked skin just moisturise or scrub?

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*sarah*

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Hi guys just wondered what is the best treatment for a diabetic client with dry cracked skin on the feet, I had a friend of mine last night who had this all did was moisturise the feet and he advised the doctor had given him cream to do so (which he had'nt been putting on (scolded lol) Just wondered if you would use a foot scrub or rasp on this?
Thanks xx
 

oey

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You do need to be very careful with any form of skin removal or abraision on diabetics as the skin can act in a totally different way to skin on people who dont have diabetes.

I am not saying you cannot exfoliate them but it all comes down to how well the skin is looked after. Most would say to get medical approval from there GP to be able to do this kind of treatment.

I am sure there will be some geek who have more first hand exprience in dealing with treatments for diabetics.
 

Chameleon

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Diabetics are a precaution yes...and im one...LOL

However if there is sensation in thier feet,and the diabetes is under control,you can still scrub the feet gently,wether it be from Creative,OPI Biosculpture,etc.

I wouldnt use any instruments or a "rasp" though,this would be far too abrasive....just er on the side of caution.:)
 

BABSann

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It really depends what type of diabetes the client has,for example those with lack of skin sensation must NOT have any form of foot treatment other than that by a medically qualified person.

When my step father was in hospital a few years ago he had fallen and tore his toenail really nasty,it was sharp and kept catching on the sheets in his hospital bed.I asked one of the nurses to cut it off and she told me they weren't allowed to...and that is a medically qualified nurse:eek:It has to be someone trained in footcare in diabetes.

It is advisable to see what type of diabetes your client has,your client will be able to tell you,and if it's not a more serious type then there is absolutely no reason whatsoever for you not to go ahead with your normal hard skin removal procedure.

Mine is using an OPI hard skin remover(the foot file type,which is the best I have ever tried,I have to say)then I soak and exfoliate.Maybe some heated booties and a foot mask for a luxury dry skin treatment would be a nice option.

If in any doubt or your client is in any doubt regarding what type of diabetes they have I would ask for a letter from the GP and then place a copy in the clients file.HTH

P.s I have many diabetic clients and have never had any that cannot have a rasp used or exfoliation as none of them have the more serious type of diabetes,generally the client will have been advised on what foot cautions they need to take into account,when the diabetes has been diagnosed.So it's quite unlikey that a diabetic with lack of skin sensation and thinning skin will come into a beauty salon for a pedicure.HTH
 

bettyboo

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My mum is diabetic, first it was diet controlled, then it was controlled by tablets now she has to inject insulin. My mum has always had it stressed to her by doctors and specialists that under no circumstances should anyone including herself take care of her feet, she has had to go to a chiropodist. Diabetics as a rule have to be very careful where their feet are concerned as it is not always about obvious lack of sensation there is more to it. I as a rule would never attempt to treat a diabetics foot, its too risky any slight problem could have severe complications.

Saying that, the first chiropodist she went to cut her :rolleyes:.

I suppose it is upto each nail tech what they decide, but imo i wouldnt treat just in case.

P.S. My mum is not even allowed to use a foot spa.
 

ValencianNails

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I have a diabetic pedicure (and nail enhancement) client, her diabetes is food controlled and she's fine with a Spa Pedicure, however, she doesn't suffer from dry cracked skin and the 'scrubbing/rasping' is extremely minimal.
She has the go-ahead from her doctor to allow her to have pedicures and she looks forward to them every month.
This particular client also has MS as well as other illnesses. Personally, I treat each case individually.
 

bettyboo

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That might be why! My mum has severe cracked feet, they bleed sometimes when she has a bad bout of it. So i guess combined with her diabetes thats why she cant have her feet touched. But still i wouldnt treat, but maybe with more confidence and a few years down the road when i am comfortable in my abilitys i might rethink?
 

ValencianNails

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That might be why! My mum has severe cracked feet, they bleed sometimes when she has a bad bout of it. So i guess combined with her diabetes thats why she cant have her feet touched. But still i wouldnt treat, but maybe with more confidence and a few years down the road when i am comfortable in my abilitys i might rethink?
So she isn't even allowed to apply something like (for example) Cucumber Heel Therapy daily as a moisturiser to help?
 

bettyboo

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Not sure? ( its too late to ring her) What i do know is that she can't
1) Trim her own toenails
2) use a foot file/Paddle
3) use a foot spa
4) use a home massage system
5) should not wear nail varnish all the time, as she needs to check colour of nails regulary for circulation problems.
6) Allow anyone other than a chiropadist to trim her nails and file her feet.
 

spoiler

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Hi Guys still being a newbie geek I thought I would reply to this thread. My little girl has had diabetes since she was 3 and is now nine, there is two types of diabetes, type 1 which is only controlled by injections and anybody under thirty can get it, and its not hereditary, type 2 is controlled by diet and tablets and unless you are very over weight and under thirty it only usually affects people older who gnerally have had a poor diet and lifestyle when younger. My daughter has a team of specalists looking after her and we see them every three months, but the big no no is messing with her feet, we check her toes and inbetween them after every bath and cut her nail very carefully. She recently had a verucca and we couldnt even apply a chemist bought cream, as its now at this young age we have to look after them, as diabetics suffer with bad circulation. This is a terrible condition and I wouldnt wish it on my worst enemy. When we first found out we tried to carry on as normal, so we took her to a local fast food restaurant and bearing in mind I had to inject my three year old, i was asked to take her into a public toilet just as I was about to inject, because it was upsetting other customers, well you can imagine my reply. sorry to rant on but this affects my beautiful and very healthy daughter every day of her life, and even having my own salon I would never ever ever mess with a diabetics feet, no matter how controlled it is.
 

Chameleon

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Not sure? ( its too late to ring her) What i do know is that she can't
1) Trim her own toenails
2) use a foot file/Paddle
3) use a foot spa
4) use a home massage system
5) should not wear nail varnish all the time, as she needs to check colour of nails regulary for circulation problems.
6) Allow anyone other than a chiropadist to trim her nails and file her feet.
Im so sorry that she can not do any of the above.:irked:
My mum is diabetic,and has severe MS,but i know its fine for her to have regular pedicures,which is advocated from her doctor.

But then this is in France,and its widely accepted from doctors there to recommend pedicurists for diabetics to educate and be aware of foot problems.The training they get is similar to a "foot doctor"or podiatrist...

Oh by the way,my mum LOVES cucmber heel therapy for her very dry skin,she uses it on her elbows aswell.It has an gentle enzymatic effect from the lactic acid which comes from milk,so its extremely hydrating and gentle.

She loved it so much she took my salon size back with her to France:eek::lol:
 

rach_kate

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i've alway gone with the 'not touching diabetics feet without dr's approval' route but for those who have and are ok just to throw into the equation ...
what about callus peel???
its non abrasive ie no rasps and gets rid of hard skin!! just wondered if anybody knows if this is allowed as not sure if the ingredients would be a problem??

xxxx
 

*sarah*

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thanks for all the replys guys, i'll get my friend to check with his doctor when come back from holiday, I think if he used the moisturiser that his doctor gave him his feet would'nt be dry and cracked lol x
 

bettyboo

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i've alway gone with the 'not touching diabetics feet without dr's approval' route but for those who have and are ok just to throw into the equation ...
what about callus peel???
its non abrasive ie no rasps and gets rid of hard skin!! just wondered if anybody knows if this is allowed as not sure if the ingredients would be a problem??

xxxx

I read an article published for doctors/heath care about foot care for diabetes.
It did stress in several of these articles that any kind of callus/corn remover product can not be used.
 

bettyboo

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Hi Guys still being a newbie geek I thought I would reply to this thread. My little girl has had diabetes since she was 3 and is now nine, there is two types of diabetes, type 1 which is only controlled by injections and anybody under thirty can get it, and its not hereditary, type 2 is controlled by diet and tablets and unless you are very over weight and under thirty it only usually affects people older who gnerally have had a poor diet and lifestyle when younger. My daughter has a team of specalists looking after her and we see them every three months, but the big no no is messing with her feet, we check her toes and inbetween them after every bath and cut her nail very carefully. She recently had a verucca and we couldnt even apply a chemist bought cream, as its now at this young age we have to look after them, as diabetics suffer with bad circulation. This is a terrible condition and I wouldnt wish it on my worst enemy. When we first found out we tried to carry on as normal, so we took her to a local fast food restaurant and bearing in mind I had to inject my three year old, i was asked to take her into a public toilet just as I was about to inject, because it was upsetting other customers, well you can imagine my reply. sorry to rant on but this affects my beautiful and very healthy daughter every day of her life, and even having my own salon I would never ever ever mess with a diabetics feet, no matter how controlled it is.
I know how this feels, my partners daughter,my stepdaughter was diagnosed with diabetes at 4 yrs old. She has type 1. She is now 13 and manages it well now. But for several years it was deeply upsetting for her and us. She hated being different. And people didnt know how to react. For example when the nice old lady down the road came over with sweets for her and then having to tell my stepdaughter she couldnt have them she cried, i wanted to cry and the old lady felt terrible. It does get easier to deal with, i think im more calmer than my partner he panicks when she has a hypo. She will grow up coping with it better than you, we worry but they are more ressilient.
Wishing love & happiness, for your daughter and you and your partner.
 

nailadee55

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Try Nordic Care Foot Creme, it's safe for diabetics and works great. I've sold it in my shop for over 5 years now, and have many repeat clients for it.

Nordic Care
 

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