Quantcast

Different tips and their uses?

SalonGeek

Help Support SalonGeek:

Deb379

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 17, 2004
Messages
675
Reaction score
14
Location
hants
Hi there

I've seen a thread on tips with no wells, can someone explain what you would use these tips for and how. I seem to recall someone said you don't need to preblend these is this right?

Why would you would use tips with wells (assume this also means contact area) which you reduce down in size?

How far do you actually reduce the contact area down as I am sure I've seen somewhere that the tip should only just sit on the free edge and not cover all the free edge (assuming not really short).

Also, what would be the best tips to use for someone who has wide flattish nail beds, or would it be better to sculpt a nail like this?

Sorry, one more, what are "cut out curve tips" are these for nail biters with bulbous nail beds?

Deb379
 

Carole Lindsay

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 3, 2004
Messages
1,036
Reaction score
11
Location
Barnet
Deb379 said:
Hi there

I've seen a thread on tips with no wells, can someone explain what you would use these tips for and how. I seem to recall someone said you don't need to preblend these is this right?

Why would you would use tips with wells (assume this also means contact area) which you reduce down in size?

How far do you actually reduce the contact area down as I am sure I've seen somewhere that the tip should only just sit on the free edge and not cover all the free edge (assuming not really short).

Also, what would be the best tips to use for someone who has wide flattish nail beds, or would it be better to sculpt a nail like this?

Sorry, one more, what are "cut out curve tips" are these for nail biters with bulbous nail beds?

Deb379
Okay Deb i'll answer as much as i can! Tips with no wells are very good for use under fibreglass ie. white ones as they dont need blending. If you have a tip with a well (and yes a well is a contact area!) you would pre-blend/cut out most of the well and leave approx. 2mm to sit on the free edge for blending with. You can buy ones that have the well cut out but often you still need to file them back a bit. If you leave the contact area in it is much more obvious and also there is not as much natural nail for the product to adhere to. I've not heard the term "cut out curve tips" but if you are dealing with nail biters then you need to leave a slightly bigger well area and also check out where the pressure of the bulbous part is and saddle the sides of the tip accordingly. That's as much as i can help with so hopefully somebody else will be able to answer the bits i cant help with!
 

geeg

Judge Gigi-Honorary Geek
Joined
Jan 12, 2003
Messages
32,644
Reaction score
1,033
Location
Benissa, Costa Blanca, Spain
Deb379 said:
Hi there

I've seen a thread on tips with no wells, can someone explain what you would use these tips for and how. I seem to recall someone said you don't need to preblend these is this right?

Why would you would use tips with wells (assume this also means contact area) which you reduce down in size?

How far do you actually reduce the contact area down as I am sure I've seen somewhere that the tip should only just sit on the free edge and not cover all the free edge (assuming not really short).

Also, what would be the best tips to use for someone who has wide flattish nail beds, or would it be better to sculpt a nail like this?

Sorry, one more, what are "cut out curve tips" are these for nail biters with bulbous nail beds?

Deb379
As we move on in the nail industry, companires offer more and more things that are different and things that are supposed to be so cool etc and to help the nail technician. Reduced well tips are just one of these additions.

It really doesn't make a scrap of difference if there is a full well, or partial well, you still have to customise for each cleient and do some adjusting to any tips. In my opinion you have to have more than one type of tip if you want them to fit all the types of nails you are going to come across.

If the client has a free edge and is not a nail biter, then you can reduce the well to equal the length of the free edge that is there. This can be different on every nail! If you always use a coloured powder for the tip, i.e. white, soft white etc, then blending can be minimal as you will cover any sign of the tip with your coloured powder. If you are going natural then you need to blend the tip until you can see no 'ghost shadow' at all.

Some tips have it all ... they are easy and quick to blend with no fuss. If you have tips that are difficult to blend, then investigate some other types (assuming you are good at blending tips and not blaming the tip for lack of expertise).

Sculpting is always your best option for practically anyone with a free edge. for wide flattish nails, Formation is a great fitting tip, if y ou don't sculpt.
 

Deb379

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 17, 2004
Messages
675
Reaction score
14
Location
hants
Excellent, thanks both of you, just needed to understand being fairly new to this.

I have been trying out the Millenium Gold tips they seem much more easier to blend however think I will need to buy some more formation tips, ones i had on my course are gone now.

Deb379
 

talented talons

Master Artist
Joined
Mar 24, 2004
Messages
3,176
Reaction score
71
Location
essex
I think its personal preference really. i have full well tips, half cut out tips and no well tips. I use these in different cases and as previously said, customise to each client. Really depends on what you want to do, or save time.
 

Deb379

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 17, 2004
Messages
675
Reaction score
14
Location
hants
Hi Talented talons

That's just it, i wouldn't really know what to use for what at the mo.

Deb379
 

Nailsinlondon1

CND Shellac Ambassador
Joined
Jan 12, 2003
Messages
7,494
Reaction score
393
Location
Greven, Germany
I use full well tips, for strange shaped nails, like sidewalls not matching, triangle sort of shape, if you can understand this.......these tips have usualy a gentle c curve a natural one........... So full well Tips for correcting natures or man made errors.


Cut out, or full well tip with well area reduced......most also have a different arch and the c curve is usualy a bit more prominent...... for most other nails.........

I use Eclipse CND, they are winged tips....for very flat nails....... square c curve, the have unnique sizing , so they are actually half size bigger..........
I have

HTH
 

Latest posts

Top