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natc

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I was reading through a few threads and i noticed that people use the term NSS for a type of salon! im proberly being dumb but what does this stand for . Im quite new to the site and not up to scratch with the Lingo! ha ha
 

Fab Freak

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natc said:
I was reading through a few threads and i noticed that people use the term NSS for a type of salon! im proberly being dumb but what does this stand for . Im quite new to the site and not up to scratch with the Lingo! ha ha
Hiya Natc - i beleive it stands for a non standard salon - ie a salon using MMA or just darn unprofessional...but one of my fellow geekettes will correct me if i am wrong...hth
 

arhnails

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Hi,

It stands for NoN Standard Salon.
Those who don't follow proper sanitation procedures. Or possibly using MMA.
And with the really low prices.
 

natc

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Sorry what does MMA satnd for im really not used to these abreveations !
 

Carole Lindsay

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natc said:
Sorry what does MMA satnd for im really not used to these abreveations !
Methyl methacrylate (at least i think that's how its spelt!)
 

Little Angel

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hi nat c

MMA was featured recently on watchdog. Good quality monomers are made with EMA and dont cause damage to the nail plate, MMA mechanically bonds to the nail plate and wont budge off it. It can cause really bad damage to the nail plate.

Non standard salons:

Unprofesional service, Poor standard of work, Poor hygene standards ect

These salons are usually quite cheap as they expect their staff to do nails in 30 mins which IMO you carnt do a decent set of nails in.
 

tanyamoniq

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Just wondering what you considered to be a normal amount of time for a full set, fill, mani, pedi? Thanks for you input!!!
 

Little Angel

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Hi

For a set of nails i would be happy with i would want 1 hour to 1 1/2 and for a fill about an hour depending on the condition. A manicure again for a solar 30 mins a spa 45-1hour a pedi 30-1hour depending on whether it is a luxury or express.

I know that some nail techs can work really fast but i focus on the quality of my work not the quantity. (not that they dont produce a good set of nails no offence meant here! :o )

I like to take my time, i spend at least 15-20 mins on my prep and a good 5 at least on my consultation and thats with a regular client, if its a new client i like 15 mins for my consultation.
;) I like to make sure they understand the commitment they are making by having a set of nails on, some people dont understand the upkeep so i like to take the time to make it really clear what is involved and what they need to expect financialy and also time wise with the appointments and the home care.

That way if they are not sure i will use a soak off system like L+P and not my LCN gel.

Sorry going on a bit now. :rolleyes: as i do!
 

tanyamoniq

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Thanks so much!!! I just finished my schooling in May and have been really concerned about the length of time it's taking me to do a set. Right now I'm at about 2 hours for a set and about an hour and a half for fills. Pretty much all we have around here are NSS salons, so a lot of people don't understand why it takes so much longer. They all use high powered drills as well. What do you all think of those?
 

Little Angel

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Hi

I dont use a drill myself as i dont see the need for one, if your application is nice and thin and your prep is done well your fills ( :rolleyes: depending on the clients homecare and any "accidents" ) should be easy to blend.
NSS salons use drill because they are a lot quicker and you can imagine if the nails have been put on quickly they are probably blending the tip in with the drill too, and the application is usually far to thick.

I have nothing against drills and in the right TRAINED hands they are an excellant tool.

I just prefer not to use one personally. :|

ps : i think those times sound fine to me. I have been doing nails a very long time :o we wont go into that though!!
 

talented talons

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I luckily haven't got any NSS salons by me, but i find it frustrating when i meet someone who expects a full set in an hour. I am still getting in my practise and take 2 and 1/2 hours for a full set and sometimes the same with infills as my clients are always heavy on their nails so a few repairs needed.

I personally don't like drills either, but as my application tends to be smooth i barely need to file so wouldn't need one. With proper training i'm sure they are fine.
 

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