oriental nail salons

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sadie123

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i dont know if this is a problem else where or even what your thoughts are but in my area 'oriental' nails are all the go they are applied using a drill and done for £20.00 for a full set of l&p (normally a salon with about 12 oriental guys working very hard) but my problem is i ve got a lady monday morning comming for a soak off after having her nails done with these guys, last time i done this it took me nearly hour and half to get them off and her nails where in a dreadfull state.has anyone any tips on how to soak these off and whats the best for after care has im really nervous abt even buffing them as they are so thin and normally tender xxx
 

littlegrohl

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Scary.. while i dont think its a "race" thing.. i do know that alot of the shops in my area that have popped up especially in shopping malls.. are using CHEAP products that most definatly contain MMA.. I had to remove a set done on a lady and it took me nearly 1 hour and 20 minutes to break through..
Walking through the mall near me i cross the other side of the pedestrian strip do i dont have to breath in the fumes..(( I have NEVER smelt anything like it in the time i have done nails..i do mine at home in my studio and have very little smell but anyway..)) I dont care if your white green or perple.. using these products danger the client, themselves and the poor techies who get stuck removing the stuff.. I will say i soaked the nails completly.. i wouldnt file it and only clipped the product that eventually lifted.. when i got to her own nail bed i decided to give her a manicure and rescheduled because they were in poor condition..
HTH
 

Sassy Hassy

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Chances are that her natural nails will be in a pretty bad state under there, so really it is best not to remove the product at all. Just infill as usual to prevent any further trauma to the nails. it is so satisfying to see those rings of fire gradually grow out.

You WILL have to warn your client that until the old product grows out she MAY have one or two problems in the meantime. However she will love you for the pleasant experience and the fact that you care about her natural nails underneath.

It's a chance for you to explain about how nails should be done, but do it in a responsible manner without any scare tactics - extol the positives and never be negative. Just say that a true professional will care as much about the natural nail underneath - so there is no damage - as much as the look and feel of the product on the top. A true professional will care about hygiene and sanitation and will not hurt or cut the client (or if they do it will be a rare occurence). Having your nails done should be a pleasant experience.

In this way you are being positive and not saying things like "oh my god the stuff they use is awful, they aren't trained, they don't sanitise so goodness knows what germs they are spreading from one client to the next! ... and so on" Not saying that this is what you or anyone else has said, just showing how it can be easy to get caught up in the emotion and using negative statements.

Otherwise all your client will do is go back to her friends and repeat these things and all her friends will do is pick up on the negativity and never have their nails done ever - anywhere.

(just as an FYI chances are the salon you are referring to actually has Vietnamese staff and not Chinese- China and Vietnam are totally different countries ... it would be like calling a Scotsman an Englishman!!!)
 

ruthsy

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Sadie - Please, please don't take this the wrong way -I really know you didn't mean it this way but I think we should avoid calling them Orienatal salons or referring to the nationalilty of the people who work there.

The reason I say this is because at one time I might have done the same. However I was talking to a nail tech from Hong Kong at a show last year. She was trained here and used quality products but was having difficulty in view of the association of orientals with NSS.

Apparantly she had used he chinese name as her business name but had since changed it She felt she now had to provide a lot of literature and provide expalantions about her training that she felt a caucasion tech would not have to do. Admittedly some of this may have been her perception but I would hate anyone to feel uncomfortable beause of a chance phrase.

After the conversation I am really careful to refer to these salons as NSS salons rather than to the nationality of the employees.
 

Lellipop

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Sadie - Please, please don't take this the wrong way -I really know you didn't mean it this way but I think we should avoid calling them Orienatal salons or referring to the nationalilty of the people who work there.

The reason I say this is because at one time I might have done the same. However I was talking to a nail tech from Hong Kong at a show last year. She was trained here and used quality products but was having difficulty in view of the association of orientals with NSS.

Apparantly she had used he chinese name as her business name but had since changed it She felt she now had to provide a lot of literature and provide expalantions about her training that she felt a caucasion tech would not have to do. Admittedly some of this may have been her perception but I would hate anyone to feel uncomfortable beause of a chance phrase.

After the conversation I am really careful to refer to these salons as NSS salons rather than to the nationality of the employees.
Totally agree I mean any nationality can be an nss salon :)
 

Bagpuss

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If they are sound and look ok then just infill them with your own product...explain the possibility of a slight difference in appearance (although i have never noticed this) and that after a few visits the product they have used will have grown off and it will be just your product left.
 

talented talons

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Definitely infill on what she has. I too had a client who had a soak off, but her nail beds were so thin, her nails were lifting within a couple of days.

When the foundation is weak, you will be hard pressed to get anything to stay on her nails. She will need to use loads of cuticle oil and keep them at a working length so no undue pressure will be put on those weak and thin nail beds.

Go for it hun, you'll do fine.
 

chantell simone

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i dont know if this is a problem else where or even what your thoughts are but in my area 'oriental' nails are all the go they are applied using a drill and done for £20.00 for a full set of l&p (normally a salon with about 12 oriental guys working very hard) but my problem is i ve got a lady monday morning comming for a soak off after having her nails done with these guys, last time i done this it took me nearly hour and half to get them off and her nails where in a dreadfull state.has anyone any tips on how to soak these off and whats the best for after care has im really nervous abt even buffing them as they are so thin and normally tender xxx
there are some nss salons near me that charge as little as £12 for a full set

if you soak off, not only will it take long but the nails may be paper thin
 

ValencianNails

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Sadie - Please, please don't take this the wrong way -I really know you didn't mean it this way but I think we should avoid calling them Orienatal salons or referring to the nationalilty of the people who work there.
I edited the original post... it said 'Chinese' and I changed it to 'Oriental' so it wasn't pointing the finger on a racial level.
hth's
 

littlegrohl

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as was the case with my client, i explained that i could infill but she specificaly asked for a fresh set.. she wasnt happy with the job.. and yea, sometimes we have to do what the client wishes.. I just explained that i would be charging a bit extra for the time it would take to get them off.. and after seeing the state of her nails underneath decided to reschedule. ((I did not say this was a bad job, i didnt say that the salon was crap, nor did i say that they were responsible for her plate damage.. for all i knew she could have abused her nails herself.. I think its important to respect other techs work no matter how bad it is.. if you have nothing nice to say, say nothing.. or wing it and talk around it))
I also think NSS is alot classier then saying oriental nail salons.. as as some one said before your race has nothing to do with skill.:)
 

CurlyQs

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Sadie - Please, please don't take this the wrong way -I really know you didn't mean it this way but I think we should avoid calling them Oriental salons or referring to the nationalilty of the people who work there.
This is such an important point Ruthsy. Great way to remind us that a comment with no ill intent can be hurtful. Thanks! alex
 

HeatherDavis

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Just a quick FYI- most of these shops employ vietnemese immigrant techs, and usually whole families of them.

And the PC term is "asian" lol.

BUT:

I have seen non-asian techs in regular reputable salons doing just as much damage as these NSS salons.

I am a firm believer in letting the goofs have as much rope as they need to hang themselves with ;)

And as for the above, as much work as it's going to be, I would soak off and re-apply very carefully. I can't guarantee my product with low quality product underneath it, and I would have them come in an hour early while I was with another client, have them sit with us and chat and soak while I work with the present client. Then the new client soaking can see just what SHOULD HAPPEN during her visits, so she won't repeat the mistake again.

Good luck!!! XO
 

hollie22

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I will not touch them!!!! I have had alot of clients come to me and i ask them to go back and get them taken off. I took one set off before it took 2 hours and the ladies finger nails were stuck to the removal bowl, a complete nightmare. Every thing I used on the ladie was ruined, the fileS!!!!, the bowl and in the end the towels. I much preffer to start a fresh not on some body elses nails .
x
 

sadie123

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sorry guys i really didnt mean to come across as ignorant but thank you all for the advice. i am grateful of any help from any one so from now on i will be very careful as i dont wont to offend any one.i eventually soaked off and got myself in a right pickle lol it took nearly 2 hours! im a bit confussed abt some of the advice though we were told in collage not 2 use 2 diff types of products together, so could i have done infills it would have been far easier xx
 

liza smith

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hi
i would think that by saying not to use two products together, they mean dont use a liquid from 1 manufacturer and a powder from another.
it is more often than not, much better to rebalance over the original product, and allow the old to grow out.
i have done this a number of times without problems, but i have also soaked them off and applied complete new set, only to encounter problems.
it is always a learning curve, but it seems quite a few geeks have discovered it is usually better to rebalnce rather than soak off & start again.
 

ButterflyGeek

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I know an Asian tech, a Taiwanese actually, and she is great! It is a shame that the bad rep people give is put on Asian techs not specifically the NSS places. (Here in NZ they are not called NSS but they are doing the exact same things.) Meh....me silly, i just found out what NSS stands for, so yea, they are the same here. I just don't understand why the clients think it is normal!
 

sadie123

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i think it just comes down to the fact that a drill can be dangerous in ANYBODYS hand if not used correctly but then you could say the same thing about a file. these nails look great but they just seem impossable to remove and they do leave a lot of damage on the nail plate, is this down to the drill ,product or my removal techniques.also its hard to compete with the prices as most clients are looking for value and at £20.00 its cheap it only takes them 45 mins and to the client they look perfect,what are your thoughts xx
 

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