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Plantar's Warts?

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veggie

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I've had a few plantar's warts on the soles of my feet for the last five years or so. My first question is, is it ok to get pedicures (and for that matter, is it ok to do them on other people with warts)? I don't recall my textbook mentioning warts at all.

Secondly, most of them don't bother me at all, but one of them is on the side of my foot and cracks really bad when calluses build up on it. I try to keep it smoothed down, but they build back up really fast, and once it's cracked deep I can't file on it or it really hurts and sometimes bleeds. When I wear sandals my feet get really dirty and dirt and grime get down into the crack. Last night I soaked my feet with some peroxide to clean it out, then once my feet were totally dry I used nail glue to close the crack up so no more dirt gets in there. Is there anything else I can do for it? Should I try a wart remover?
 

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Not an expert on this matter, not quite sure what these warty things are. I don't really think it is a great idea to put nail glue on the sore crack, it probably is making it worse not better. Have you tried 'New Skin' it can be used on burns and cuts etc... at least it is a more hygenic method, I think they do it in Boots. Personally I use 'Pink' Germoline ointment on any sore I ever get and to be honest it not only gets the crap out of the sore, but it also has a general anisthetic which numbs the area a bit.

Another option is go to Chiropodist, he can prescribe you a prescription cream which may do the job.

Hope they get better soon
 

veggie

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thenaillounge said:
Not an expert on this matter, not quite sure what these warty things are. I don't really think it is a great idea to put nail glue on the sore crack, it probably is making it worse not better. Have you tried 'New Skin' it can be used on burns and cuts etc... at least it is a more hygenic method, I think they do it in Boots. Personally I use 'Pink' Germoline ointment on any sore I ever get and to be honest it not only gets the crap out of the sore, but it also has a general anisthetic which numbs the area a bit.

Another option is go to Chiropodist, he can prescribe you a prescription cream which may do the job.

Hope they get better soon
Well i just used the nail glue since it was all I had lying around, and for now it seems to help. It doesn't hurt anymore. I'll look for the product you mentioned. Thanks.
 

Nailsinlondon1

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veggie said:
I've had a few plantar's warts on the soles of my feet for the last five years or so. My first question is, is it ok to get pedicures (and for that matter, is it ok to do them on other people with warts)? I don't recall my textbook mentioning warts at all.

Secondly, most of them don't bother me at all, but one of them is on the side of my foot and cracks really bad when calluses build up on it. I try to keep it smoothed down, but they build back up really fast, and once it's cracked deep I can't file on it or it really hurts and sometimes bleeds. When I wear sandals my feet get really dirty and dirt and grime get down into the crack. Last night I soaked my feet with some peroxide to clean it out, then once my feet were totally dry I used nail glue to close the crack up so no more dirt gets in there. Is there anything else I can do for it? Should I try a wart remover?
Here is some info I took from the The American Podiatric Medical Association.
After reading this, I would go and see a Podiastrist and get it sorted........
I dont think resin is a good idea............
Also I would not go for a pedicure............
Over here in the UK we would class that as a Contra Indication and would refere any client to a Podiastrist, GP or Chiropadist..............

I hope this helps

What are plantar warts?
Warts are one of several soft tissue conditions of the foot that can be quite painful. They are caused by a virus, which generally invades the skin through small or invisible cuts and abrasions. They can appear anywhere on the skin, but, technically, only those on the sole are properly called plantar warts.

Children, especially teenagers, tend to be more susceptible to warts than adults; some people seem to be immune.​

Identification Problems



Most warts are harmless, even though they may be painful. They are often mistaken for corns or calluses—which are layers of dead skin that build up to protect an area which is being continuously irritated. The wart, however, is a viral infection.

It is also possible for a variety of more serious lesions to appear on the foot, including malignant lesions such as carcinomas and melanomas. Although rare, these conditions can sometimes be misidentified as a wart. It is wise to consult a podiatric physician when any suspicious growth or eruption is detected on the skin of the foot in order to ensure a correct diagnosis.

Plantar warts tend to be hard and flat, with a rough surface and well-defined boundaries; warts are generally raised and fleshier when they appear on the top of the foot or on the toes. Plantar warts are often gray or brown (but the color may vary), with a center that appears as one or more pinpoints of black. It is important to note that warts can be very resistant to treatment and have a tendency to reoccur.

Source of the Virus

The plantar wart is often contracted by walking barefoot on dirty surfaces or littered ground where the virus is lurking. The causative virus thrives in warm, moist environments, making infection a common occurrence in communal bathing facilities.

If left untreated, warts can grow to an inch or more in circumference and can spread into clusters of several warts; these are often called mosaic warts. Like any other infectious lesion, plantar warts are spread by touching, scratching, or even by contact with skin shed from another wart. The wart may also bleed, another route for spreading.

Occasionally, warts can spontaneously disappear after a short time, and, just as frequently, they can recur in the same location.

When plantar warts develop on the weight-bearing areas of the foot—the ball of the foot, or the heel, for example—they can be the source of sharp, burning pain. Pain occurs when weight is brought to bear directly on the wart, although pressure on the side of a wart can create equally intense pain.

Tips for Prevention



  • Avoid walking barefoot, except on sandy beaches.​
  • Change shoes and socks daily.​
  • Keep feet clean and dry.​
  • Check children's feet periodically.​
  • Avoid direct contact with warts—from other persons or from other parts of the body.​
  • Do not ignore growths on, or changes in, your skin.​
  • Visit your podiatric physician as part of your annual health checkup.​

Self Treatment

Self treatment is generally not advisable. Over-the-counter preparations contain acids or chemicals that destroy skin cells, and it takes an expert to destroy abnormal skin cells (warts) without also destroying surrounding healthy tissue. Self treatment with such medications especially should be avoided by people with diabetes and those with cardiovascular or circulatory disorders. Never use them in the presence of an active infection.


Professional Treatment


It is possible that your podiatric physician will prescribe and supervise your use of a wart-removal prepa- ration. More likely, however, removal of warts by a simple surgical procedure, performed under local anesthetic, may be indicated.

Lasers have become a common and effective treatment. A procedure known as CO2 laser cautery is performed under local anesthesia either in your podiatrist’s office surgical setting or an outpatient surgery facility. The laser reduces post-treatment scarring and is a safe form for eliminating wart lesions.

[font=Helvetica,Helv,Arial]Wart Tips From The APMA[/font]
Self treatment is generally not advisable. Over-the-counter preparations contain acids or chemicals that destroy skin cells, and it takes an expert to destroy abnormal skin cells (warts) without also destroying surrounding healthy tissue. Self treatment with such medications especially should be avoided by people with diabetes and those with cardiovascular or circulatory disorders. Never use them in the presence of an active infection.


APMA recommends the following tips for individuals with warts:

  • Avoid self treatment with over the counter preparations.

  • Seek professional podiatric evaluation and assistance with the treament of your warts.

  • Diabetics and other patients with circulatory, immunological or neurological problems should be especially careful with the treament of their warts.

  • Warts may spread and are catching. Make sure you have your warts evaluated to protect yourself and those close to you.

http://www.apma.org/topics/Warts.htm
 

veggie

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Ok, I guess I should see a podiatrist then. Thanks!
 

mum

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Another name is varucca and they are pretty contageous. You can get a treatment froma pharmacist but, as you have several, you should get them removed professionally
Marian
 

Herman

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Anatomically speaking the word "Plantar" refers to the bottom of the foot. Plantar arch is the arch on the bottom of your foot and plantarflexion is to bend the foot towards the ground e.g as in walking. Dorsiflexion is the opposite, bending the foot upwards. Dorsi meaning top. A dorsal fin on a fish is the fin on the top of the fish.


Just a useless pearl of wisdom i thought i would share with you.......H
 

stevenson_s

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my friend had a plantar's wart and had it removed surgically (it was cut out). it was an outpatient procedure. i would suggest that you go to the podiatrist and have your feet examined.
 

yogacat

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I agree that you need to treat the verrucae properly.
I had a verruca for some time which i could not get rid of. I went to have it frozen off at the drs twice, and it got bigger both times (not to mention hurting like @:*&).
I went to the Chinese herbalist and got a herbal infusion to soak my feet in and it went in a very short time. I was impressed!

If your verrucae is small, neat tea tree morning and night should be enough to get rid of it. Larger ones may need more persuasion. They can be a sign that your immune system needs a bit of perking up.
If you live with other people, be careful not to give it to them - avoid sharing towels, and try not to walk on warm damp floors which you share.
 

veggie

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Hmm, there's a Chinese Herbalist very close to my house. The warts are very small, but I can't use tea tree oil anymore as I used it once when I was very very sick and now the smell nauseates me really bad.
 
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