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Continuing EduKashun

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The Geek

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Who needs it? Why bother. U got full books... been there done it... wore the pants.

How often do you guys think you should go for continuing education? Many states in the US have requirements that you must attend x amount of hours annually. What so you guys think?
 

Mrs Gadget

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definately think you should continue with education/training especially in our line of work.

Qualified in May last year and have been on 3 courses with another one coming up in a couple of weeks.

I want to know everything new which comes onto the market and think that to be further educated with what new comes along is a must.

sorry am rambling but because I am so new to this job I want to learn more all the time, unfortunately beause I work approx 60-65 hrs per week my only day for training is sunday but hey who needs a day off?
 

Peppercorn Nails

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In total agreeance, 'once trained, continue training'

I completed my Masters Nov 2001. In 2002 I went back and did another Master class and a 1-1.

At present am considering doing either another master class or another 1-1 (I want to sort my sculpting out).

Now I might be speaking out of turn, but I imagine that at some point you reach a stage where additional training is generally only needed to keep you in line with any new products or techniques (unless there's something fundamentally wrong!), and in which case once or twice a year would probably sufficient.

What do you say?

Adele
 

meckleberry

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As for nail techs in Illinois we are required to have 12 hours every 2 years. As a novice I think I NEED more. :study:
 

Christie's Nails

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I think a tech should be required to get more education annually...or as geek boy says...
Lol..sorry, I am a mom, just got done helping kids with homework, heehee
 

Jane

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Once a year at least. Not just to catch up on new products. I think it's possible to become a bit sloppy when you're sitting on the production line in the salon 6 days a week. There is always room for improvement.
Jane
 

The Geek

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But christie... pray tell whatever do you mean ;)
 

nail_star2003

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I think everyone should do the minimum of 1 or 2 course/s every year just to keep your skills up and learn more than you thought you knew!

That said it is difficult if you have other responsibilities such as children because I know personally that you don't always have the money to go on new courses.

Slightly separate from this, what courses etc. do you need to complete to obtain your Masters Mr Geek :?: :fro: (or anyone else who knows).

Thanx
 

Glorsclaws

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Because I'm a novice I still feel like 'a sponge - soaking everything up'. I cant imagine that I'll ever see a day when I feel that I'm done training. I think I'd be on a course every week if my finances allowed it.
 

naturalnails

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I am in full agreement that you should have continuing education but my problem would be - where do you go. Sod's law says there is never education within spitting distance. I also feel that we learn lots of different things from different companies but the problem is you have to buy a training kit to use on the course in most cases and then although you have received great information you may end up with products that either you dont like or dont want.

Difficult one this huh!

In an ideal world (in the UK) :rolleyes: training should be generic and high quality with everyone working together for the good of the industry rather than it being about product sales but hey ho who lives in an ideal world.
 

nailtech

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In the years I have been in the nail biz I have taken a couple of conversion courses each year with various companies out there. I've also done my NVQ 2, IHBC & NVQ 3.

Even though I don't feel I actually need it at this point, I will do at least one this year. Love to go on my travels & I really enjoy the social aspect of meeting other techs & it gets me outta this 2 horse town :tongue:

I met Vicki Peters last year on a course - that was cool!
 

Christie's Nails

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But christie... pray tell whatever do you mean
You know what they say about power don't you Geek? It corrupts... ;)
 

The Geek

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Christie's Nails said:
You know what they say about power don't you Geek? It corrupts... ;)
You know what they say about sass masters...

um....

"when you find out will you tell me?"

Gotta love the edit/delete facilites here :)

tooooooodles
 

The Geek

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naturalnails said:
In an ideal world (in the UK) :rolleyes: training should be generic and high quality with everyone working together for the good of the industry rather than it being about product sales but hey ho who lives in an ideal world.
Ahhh... the perfect world... the one next to Jupiter :)

The problem I have found is that when you make generic education... you get generic results.
In order to make it generic the quality gets watered and dumbed down.

At least with product companies, you can have it specialised.
The only course I know of (besides the foundation course) that the Creative Academies do in the UK that requires you to buy a kit is the conversion.
None of the masters do. You buy the course and its a BYOC (bring your own crap).

I feel that the quality of generic education (though good in theory) always ends up being... well... generic.

In my opinion, you find the system you want to excel in and learn every nook and cranny there is to learn about it so you can become the best. That is focused training and it is what will make you a stellar (instead of a generic) tech.

Anyhooo... just my train of thought.... know where youre coming from though.

toooooodles
 

nailtech

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sorry, don't agree about the generic bit (am I allowed to disagree???). You can't win though, if you teach using a specific product line, then you are "accused" of pushing that line blah blah.
 

naturalnails

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The Nail Geek said:
The only course I know of (besides the foundation course) that the Creative Academies do in the UK that requires you to buy a kit is the conversion.
None of the masters do. You buy the course and its a BYOC (bring your own crap).
Correct me if I have misunderstood but are you saying you can do Master classes without using CND products.
 

The Geek

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-ack- Sorry... I mean BYOC means Bring your own Creative :)

The master classes are focused (obviously) on the Creative line. There is little benefit to be had by attending a course where you are shown to get the right mix ratio when whatever you are using has a completely different ratio.
I was just referring to the fact that no... You don’t have to buy a kit in order to attend.

sorry, don't agree about the generic bit (am I allowed to disagree???). You can't win though, if you teach using a specific product line, then you are "accused" of pushing that line blah blah.
Of course you can disagree... our differing points of view are what make message boards like this actually interesting to read.

Here is why I disagree:

As mentioned above... if you go and take a 'generic' course on product application... how can you learn how to achieve the proper mix ratio? Mix ratios differ from company to company.
Tip compositions differ from company to company
Powder compositions differ from company to company.
Application techniques vary greatly from company to company.

There are areas in which generic education is beneficial... take natural nail anatomy. That doesn’t differ from company to company.

My point is that if you try to level the playing field so that education is education regardless of the technology that makes up the system you use... you are bound to be at a deficit in the ability to maximize your performance with the product.

Product sales are what pay for education. Education is a lost money maker. Creative invests upwards of £1,000,000 a year into education but takes a mere fraction of that through course sales.

The whole purpose of the 'company led education' is that the sales can help buffer the cost of the courses so that many more can benefit from the classes themselves.
Sure... The thought is that if you are highly educated in the product line... you will have little need to buy any other companies product. But isn’t that a small cost to pay? Seems an even trade off to me.

Look at US education for nail techs (uh-oh here we go again :) ) that is usually very generic. Almost every single nail tech out there that I have ever met in the US claim that they use little to no information they obtained from the schooling. Where did they get it then? From company sponsored educational events/classes/other techs they work with.

To me that says that:
There is a place for generic education (i.e. natural nail care)
There is a place for focused, product line driven courses.

When you try to be all things to all people, you end up being nothing to everybody.
 

BrendaLeeNPW

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:D As much as a nailtech can afford it, I say train, train, train! I agree with the Grandmaster Geek that one shd become an expert in their most favorite line. I have diff. lines that I work with However, one is my all time fave. I try to take at least 1 class with that company per year. I also update/refresh my overall nailtech training & skills via videotape. It possible, every tech shd try to attend at least 1 nails only trade show every 2 yrs. to stay motivated! (once a yr is even better:)My backround is in classical ballet, music & concert modern dance technique so I feel that training is a lifelong process. We never really "arrive" at out pinnacle until we are just about to graduate to the next level. (the supernatural level) In other words, we have to keep learning, growing, pressing, reaching & perfecting until we die or give up the art of nails.

Blessings!
 

FingerNailFixer

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In Iowa we only have to get 8 hours every two years, I try to get 24 or 32 if it is possible. I think without education any industry can die. I actually dream of being an educator for Creative.
 

Christie's Nails

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Once again we understand why he is The Grand Master Geek.
He is the master of choosing his words carefully. You are right geek, you are the least likely to offend. ;)

Ok folks, here is what I think....
The "generic" schooling that I got by attending 4 months of nail school was this... anatomy, nail disorders, sani-disin-steril, bacteria info. These things are vital to know when doing nails. By knowing these things will you instantly be able to create awesome nails?..no. But I think that you MUST know these things before you can move on to learn how to use a product.

These schools are really not meant to teach you how to create awesome nails. They are required by the state you live in to make sure that nail techs know the basics for the health of the people they work on. From this foundation..you can then take classes with different companies that offer them to learn how to use their product.

CND is awesome about all the classes they offer. Because of a class they offered here on my island 2 months after I got out of school, I used CND products for 3 years...and am still using a great deal of them.
So I think my vote is...both generic and product specific classes are important.
OK..that became a speach...now I gotta go to town and get some shopping done. bye! ;)
 
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