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xAnnaBannAx

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As fungus seems to be quite a common thing (particularly on the feet) could anyone explain how they carry out a manicure/pedicure with polish without contaminating the polishes?

I understand a lot of technicians would wear gloves if a client had a fungal infection...but would you still use polish...and if so...doesnt that polish then become infected?
 

naturalnails

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xAnnaBannAx

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well i dont know..the impression i get from reading peoples threads is that you can treat but a lot of people just wear gloves.
I would of though its ok to treat as long as using disposable things and thoroughly sterilising non-disposables...but wondered what people do when it comes to the polish...maybe polish isnt used.
 

xAnnaBannAx

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thanx for the link ill have a read.
 

naturalnails

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xAnnaBannAx

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thanx they are quite interesting reading..still wondering about the polish tho lol
 

Cathie!

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Possibly the same reason we don't need to sanitise out nail brushes....monomor/polish doesn't contain water so can't harbour any living organisms???
 

geeg

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If a client had this condition I would ask her to purchase her own polish from me and then we would use that.

Bacteria will not grow in polish (thats why most of them contain formaldehyde) but I still would not like the idea of using a brush on someone with an infection and then using it on another client. I'd miss out on a retail sale too. and I wouldn't do that!! :lol:
 

xAnnaBannAx

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thanx for the threads they have been really useful and pretty much answered my question :o)
 

rubydooby

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You have to be extremely careful when treating people with fungal nail infections. i would reccommend that you dont treat it until there problem is sorted for a number of reason. When filling the nail, little sheds of nail come off into the air, n can be really dangerous for you as a therapist to inhale that. also the risk of your tools etc picking up the infection, n also for you. the risk of you picking up the fungal infection. Just be careful, maybe wear a mask if you have to treat. i think you will find that if you do paint the nails, all the chemicals in the nail varnish would destroy any kind of infection that the brush may have been picked up. hope this is of help to you! xx
 

maxine1

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Quote from geeg

If a client had this condition I would ask her to purchase her own polish from me and then we would use that.

Bacteria will not grow in polish (thats why most of them contain formaldehyde) but I still would not like the idea of using a brush on someone with an infection and then using it on another client. I'd miss out on a retail sale too. and I wouldn't do that!!

Hi
NEVER work on any client who has any sort of infection!
It does not matter who owns the polish!
Clients with infections are to be turned away and treated by a DR - we are not DR's and therefore should not treat or touch that client.

Cheers
 

geeg

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Quote from geeg

If a client had this condition I would ask her to purchase her own polish from me and then we would use that.

Bacteria will not grow in polish (thats why most of them contain formaldehyde) but I still would not like the idea of using a brush on someone with an infection and then using it on another client. I'd miss out on a retail sale too. and I wouldn't do that!!

Hi
NEVER work on any client who has any sort of infection!
It does not matter who owns the polish!
Clients with infections are to be turned away and treated by a DR - we are not DR's and therefore should not treat or touch that client.

Cheers
A simple Bacterial infection ('Greenie') and a fungal infection are two very different things.

Of course I would work on a client who had had a bacterial infection.

As for a client with a mild fungal infection, I would do the same and ofcourse take the appropriate action with tools, towels and foot bath. I always line my footbath (for every client) with a plastic bag made for the purpose and then fill with water so that there is no chance of contamination at all in that area.
 

maxine1

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As Nail Techs we are only licensed to beauitfy the hands and nails, and not to diagonise and treat fingernail disorders or diseases. Proper medical diagonises and treatment must always be reccommended.

Nail Infections
Nail technicians are not trained to diagnose or treat nail infections. However, we do understand the difference between bacterial and fungal infections in order to use the appropriate terminology.

Bacterial: Despite terms such as fungus or mold, the appearance of a greenish discoloration on or under the nail plate suggests a bacterial infection. Bacterial infections can result from moisture trapped between the natural nail and a nail enhancement. The green pigment is a byproduct. If allowed to persist, the discoloration will darken and the nail will become noticeably soft in the affected area. Fortunately, a bacterial infection in its early stages can be easily treated with an alcohol-based antiseptic, and the discoloration will fade as the nail grows. Note that nail enhancements do not cause infections, bacteria do. This is why regular maintenance and salon sanitation are so important!

Fungal: A fungal infection appears very different from a bacterial infection: the nail, particularly at the free edge, may be yellowish, thickened and somewhat crumbly. Fungus can develop after injury to the nail plate or surrounding tissue. Subungal debris, the moist, odiferous matter that can accumulate under an affected nail, may be cultured to determine the source of infection. Because fungal infections can cause permanent damage, it is important to seek medical treatment. Most fungal infections require oral medications, and might take six months or longer to clear completely.


I have not know of any Australian training school that would teach its students that its OK to do an enhancement on a client with a fungal infection.

They always recommend that the client should be sent to the DR's.

I did speak to my insurance guy yesterday, he said if I recommend the wrong treatment or the client has an adverse reaction I WOULD RUN THE RISK OF BEING SUED!!!

So my suggestion would be, not to touch that client - posts Ive read do agree, but if in doubt - speak to a DR , contact your insurance company and city council for their recommendations.

Hope thats helps.
 

Zingara

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As Nail Techs we are only licensed to beauitfy the hands and nails, and not to diagonise and treat fingernail disorders or diseases. Proper medical diagonises and treatment must always be reccommended.

Nail Infections
Nail technicians are not trained to diagnose or treat nail infections. However, we do understand the difference between bacterial and fungal infections in order to use the appropriate terminology.

Bacterial: Despite terms such as fungus or mold, the appearance of a greenish discoloration on or under the nail plate suggests a bacterial infection. Bacterial infections can result from moisture trapped between the natural nail and a nail enhancement. The green pigment is a byproduct. If allowed to persist, the discoloration will darken and the nail will become noticeably soft in the affected area. Fortunately, a bacterial infection in its early stages can be easily treated with an alcohol-based antiseptic, and the discoloration will fade as the nail grows. Note that nail enhancements do not cause infections, bacteria do. This is why regular maintenance and salon sanitation are so important!

Fungal: A fungal infection appears very different from a bacterial infection: the nail, particularly at the free edge, may be yellowish, thickened and somewhat crumbly. Fungus can develop after injury to the nail plate or surrounding tissue. Subungal debris, the moist, odiferous matter that can accumulate under an affected nail, may be cultured to determine the source of infection. Because fungal infections can cause permanent damage, it is important to seek medical treatment. Most fungal infections require oral medications, and might take six months or longer to clear completely.


I have not know of any Australian training school that would teach its students that its OK to do an enhancement on a client with a fungal infection.

They always recommend that the client should be sent to the DR's.

I did speak to my insurance guy yesterday, he said if I recommend the wrong treatment or the client has an adverse reaction I WOULD RUN THE RISK OF BEING SUED!!!

So my suggestion would be, not to touch that client - posts Ive read do agree, but if in doubt - speak to a DR , contact your insurance company and city council for their recommendations.

Hope thats helps.
Hi Maxine1....I guess thats worthwhile textbook advice for a lot of technicians starting out that don't have massive experience with diseases and contra-indications, but as Gigi (Geeg) is one of the worlds foremost nail experts, and pretty much wrote the book, her advice is very worthwhile! I very much doubt that she would ever recommend the wrong treatment or risk any potential allergens....most of us on here turn to her for her advice in situations like this!

Of course, if you personally don't feel comfortable treating a client, then by all means turn them away...better that you operate within your comfort zone, but it's very worth finding out and listening to what you can and can't do from people with experience like Geeg, as with a few simple precautions, thats another few clients for you...and more retail sales!

Incidentally, there are often difference between countries, so what is the norm for Australian insurance companies woudn't necessarily be so for us here in the Uk for example, and training practise may well differ also.
 

maxine1

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Incidentally, there are often difference between countries, so what is the norm for Australian insurance companies woudn't necessarily be so for us here in the Uk for example, and training practise may well differ also.

Sorry, of course.
Forgot this in not an Aussie site.
We have different guidelines in different states as well!
 

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