Gel nails popping off, ready to give up and quit

SalonGeek

Help Support SalonGeek:

BrokenBatWings

New Member
Joined
May 31, 2020
Messages
2
Reaction score
0
Location
BC, Canada
Hi everyone, I'm a nail tech in BC, Canada, who had graduated in December and is now working in a wonderful salon since March.

When I was in school, I had the occasional nail fall off but nothing crazy. However, ever since I started at this salon, almost all of my gel sets have been falling off. I've gotten extra training from both the owner and the other girls who work there, so now I'm copying their processes, but the same issue still arises. I wish I could say that I know what I'm doing wrong, but I don't - I've tried everything but the sets keep coming off, even after extreme prep and making sure the adhesion is there for the gel.

I know I've only really been doing nails for a small bit of time, but I'm so embarrassed and ashamed that I want to give up; the owner wouldn't be losing anything by getting rid of me at this point, and I feel like I'm just dragging her business down. Please, any advice at all? Acrylics aren't commonly done in Canada and we don't do them in the salon, so this is only an issue with builder gel.
 

7th-Heaven

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 1, 2017
Messages
276
Reaction score
224
Location
Norway
Hi. Sorry you're experiencing this. I know how disheartening it can be. Sometimes it can be down to a very simple thing, like a primer being old, or perhaps you're cleansing with the wrong type of wipes, the lamp isn't curing your products properly all the way, your filing technique, or your cuticle area isn't completely flush to the natural nail, perhaps insufficient C-curve or apex being too high/flat. Troubleshooting all these could help identify the issue. It would help us help you if you had some pictures of your work, from side and front as well. Do you have any pictures at all? :)
 

BrokenBatWings

New Member
Joined
May 31, 2020
Messages
2
Reaction score
0
Location
BC, Canada
Sorry for not attaching photos! I'll add some here for you.

All the girls use different lamps and primers/bonders, and I’ve been having to use theirs since I’m new and don’t have my own products yet. They’re not having issues at all so I’m at a loss.

80D28AA8-6A87-4652-89AE-B95DC48FFD17.jpeg06D2203B-46C7-4DC5-90AC-6A92F6276225.jpeg0FD297DF-A69C-4E92-9095-B125A0E5DC33.jpeg

Hi. Sorry you're experiencing this. I know how disheartening it can be. Sometimes it can be down to a very simple thing, like a primer being old, or perhaps you're cleansing with the wrong type of wipes, the lamp isn't curing your products properly all the way, your filing technique, or your cuticle area isn't completely flush to the natural nail, perhaps insufficient C-curve or apex being too high/flat. Troubleshooting all these could help identify the issue. It would help us help you if you had some pictures of your work, from side and front as well. Do you have any pictures at all? :)
I just attached some photos in a comment for you to see (sorry that one's upside down - it wasn't when I uploaded it). Hopefully you can help me see where I've gone wrong!
 

BobSweden

Managing Director
Premium Geek
Joined
Sep 4, 2008
Messages
925
Reaction score
660
Location
Sweden / Germany / UK
All the girls use different lamps and primers/bonders, and I've been having to use theirs since I'm new and don't have my own products yet. They're not having any issues at all so I'm at a loss.
It is not so easy to just start using products that you have not been trained in or have a longer experience, and create reliable nails. Especially if each colleague is using a different brand and UV lamp.

But assuming that you are following their recommendations and advice, the most likely cause is insufficient nail preparation. This is something that from my experience, many school fail to explain the importance of. If the surface of the nail has not been properly prepared, the material will not adhere correctly. So my advice would be to especially focus on this and what exactly what you most experience colleague does. You can also try increasing the curing time - if you apply the product more thickly, more time would be needed. By doubling the time, you can determine if this was one of the issues.
 

Alison Pilkington-Child

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 11, 2018
Messages
434
Reaction score
295
Location
Kent
Increasing cure time is a very useful troubleshooting exercise. If your application is a touch too thick that can cause issues, also, are you capping the free edge?
 

tuna816

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 9, 2020
Messages
55
Reaction score
14
Location
USA
Some people aren't cut out to do nails. Sorry but that's just the truth. Doing nails requires a healthy(physically) mind. When doing nails, you use your mind's eye and working memory. If these two things are not in good working order, good luck doing nails to where the client will find it satisfactory.

It will usually take a nail tech 2-3 months of practice before dishing out satisfactory work. People with healthy brains learn very fast. Ive seen this over and over, which is why im saying all of this.

It could be that you arn't putting in enough practice, but there comes a point where you have to ask yourself, just how much practice should you invest? No one spends 10 years practicing. You either get it the first couple of months or not. And that may sound harsh, but facing reality only makes you stronger.

So nails may not be for you. And thats ok.
 

Trinity

Brush Slayer Geek
Premium Geek
Joined
Jun 24, 2003
Messages
6,007
Reaction score
3,946
Location
Brighton, East Sussex
Some people aren't cut out to do nails. Sorry but that's just the truth. Doing nails requires a healthy(physically) mind. When doing nails, you use your mind's eye and working memory. If these two things are not in good working order, good luck doing nails to where the client will find it satisfactory.

It will usually take a nail tech 2-3 months of practice before dishing out satisfactory work. People with healthy brains learn very fast. Ive seen this over and over, which is why im saying all of this.

It could be that you arn't putting in enough practice, but there comes a point where you have to ask yourself, just how much practice should you invest? No one spends 10 years practicing. You either get it the first couple of months or not. And that may sound harsh, but facing reality only makes you stronger.

So nails may not be for you. And thats ok.
Tuan/BestTech is that you?
 

tuna816

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 9, 2020
Messages
55
Reaction score
14
Location
USA
Tuan/BestTech is that you?
Hey Ms Trinity. Yes its me. I forgot my old login info, lol.

Haven't been here in a while with the whole covid19 thing.
 

Trinity

Brush Slayer Geek
Premium Geek
Joined
Jun 24, 2003
Messages
6,007
Reaction score
3,946
Location
Brighton, East Sussex
Hey Ms Trinity. Yes its me. I forgot my old login info, lol.

Haven't been here in a while with the whole covid19 thing.
Glad to hear you are safe and well, not sure I agree with your statements above, but nothing changes ;) :D
 

Alison Pilkington-Child

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 11, 2018
Messages
434
Reaction score
295
Location
Kent
Some people aren't cut out to do nails. Sorry but that's just the truth. Doing nails requires a healthy(physically) mind. When doing nails, you use your mind's eye and working memory. If these two things are not in good working order, good luck doing nails to where the client will find it satisfactory.

It will usually take a nail tech 2-3 months of practice before dishing out satisfactory work. People with healthy brains learn very fast. Ive seen this over and over, which is why im saying all of this.

It could be that you arn't putting in enough practice, but there comes a point where you have to ask yourself, just how much practice should you invest? No one spends 10 years practicing. You either get it the first couple of months or not. And that may sound harsh, but facing reality only makes you stronger.

So nails may not be for you. And thats ok.
I have an auto immune condition that has affected my working memory, since acquiring it I’ve learned to sail and passed my day skipper and learned to do nails and doing very well at it. It doesn’t get in the way if you don’t let it.[emoji1360]
 

blossom

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 30, 2007
Messages
9,315
Reaction score
2,758
Location
South Coast. UK
Glad to hear you are safe and well, not sure I agree with your statements above, but nothing changes ;) :D
Ha! Well done Trinity. I did think the tone had a familiar ring.
 

tuna816

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 9, 2020
Messages
55
Reaction score
14
Location
USA
I have an auto immune condition that has affected my working memory, since acquiring it I’ve learned to sail and passed my day skipper and learned to do nails and doing very well at it. It doesn’t get in the way if you don’t let it.[emoji1360]
Thats quite amazing to hear actually. But im not exactly sure if we both have the same exact understanding of working memory and minds eye. For me, I can't hold images in my minds eye long enough. So it prevents me from doing something as simple as file a nail to where it is straight. That is why I don't do nails but I do other things such as the scientific side of nails.

Anyone who can polish smoothly or file a set of natural nails to where its perfectly shaped and even, always has my admiration. Im always harsh on these people though because I secretly envy the skills they possess - though this is often mistaken for arrogance.
 
Last edited:

Trinity

Brush Slayer Geek
Premium Geek
Joined
Jun 24, 2003
Messages
6,007
Reaction score
3,946
Location
Brighton, East Sussex
Thats quite amazing to hear actually. But im not exactly sure if we both have the same exact understanding of working memory and minds eye. For me, I can't hold images in my minds eye long enough. So it prevents me from doing something as simple as file a nail to where it is straight. That is why I don't do nails but I do other things such as the scientific side of nails.

Anyone who can polish smoothly or file a set of natural nails to where its perfectly shaped and even, always has my admiration. Im always harsh on these people though because I secretly envy the skills they possess - though this is often mistaken for arrogance.
Nope, we don't misunderstand you, you make sweeping statements with no thought to other perspectives other than your own - that is the very definition of arrogance. That said, you do have the grace and decency to apologise and recognise when you are shown to be incorrect, that takes a strength of character which I use to balance replies and reactions.

A very relevant mantra was given to me many years ago it's 'be teachable, you are not always right'
 

Latest posts

Top