Nail business at 15, would you even get insurance?

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amurphy105

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Nailsxpress... You said it... I try not to worry about the upstarts around me. Yes, they take some of my business occasionally, but not usually for long. And the ones that want the cheap priced enhancements are the ones who don't maintain them. That's not my longterm clientele. I love my faithful clients. And I show it. I do warn these kids that Louisiana IS a licensed state, tho. Next step would be to turn them in. I suppose I should, but I straddle the fence on that unless they are being unsafe because I know a lot of the salons around me are dirtier than some of these young women.

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sleepingbeauty

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Schools offer collegiate beauty and hair courses. They are usually level one trained and cover the basics of manicure, I believe.
Yes it is definately something thats been offered in 'some' English schools, although it isnt done at actual school for the girls that I know who have done it.

These girls have to start their day at a training school 1 or 2 mornings a week & then go back to school in the afternoon. None of them could do things like Acrylics on actual models due to their ages & because they couldnt get insurance. But they did learn manicure & learnt the techniques of doing Acrylics on practise hands :) From what I know these girls would come out with a NVQ, but as of this year these NVQ's won't be recognised I think the government has just pulled the plug on them, so I dont think it will be offered any longer.

For those schools that participated it was with schools where girls generally underperformed so they were reaching out to help give these girls something more of a life skill rather than the normal subjects the students just wouldnt turn up to otherwise ..
 

CazCardiff

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My 14 year old sister in law has just completed her level 1 beauty at School. She is not an "under achiever" by all means. She's the highest achiever in the year, had 6 months off school due to a serious illness and walked straight back in to exams, and still came out with all A*. The school she goes to is a very good English school and has entrance exams etc. (I went there too, so did my husband and we're certainly not underachievers) :lol:
Therefor I disregard the comment someone made about Beauty courses being offered in underachieving schools/pupils. She chose Beauty because she was interested in it. That is all. She isn't continuing with level 2 as she has taken up other courses of interest, but had she carried on, she would be level 2 qualified at the age of 15.
As for insurance..Im sure there are providers out there that offer it, its just finding them. Good on the girl for getting out there and having the confidence to go it alone and do something in this current hard economic situation!
xx
 

blossom

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As most insurance companies require written parental consent for an under-16 yr old to have nail extensions applied, I find it confusing that it's possible to train and get insured to actually do the applying!

For all the same reasons that an under 16 should need parental consent to have them applied.

All the handling and decanting and disposing of potentially hazardous chemicals?
Is that really going to be ok?


I'm not saying it is or it isn't, but it's hard to understand the logic on the one hand of not validating a tech's insurance if she does extensions on an under 16, and then insuring perhaps that same under-16 year old to do them on other people.

Crazy. (And an interesting thread!!)
 

Adamantine

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My 14 year old sister in law has just completed her level 1 beauty at School. She is not an "under achiever" by all means. She's the highest achiever in the year, had 6 months off school due to a serious illness and walked straight back in to exams, and still came out with all A*. The school she goes to is a very good English school and has entrance exams etc. (I went there too, so did my husband and we're certainly not underachievers) :lol:
Therefor I disregard the comment someone made about Beauty courses being offered in underachieving schools/pupils. She chose Beauty because she was interested in it. That is all. She isn't continuing with level 2 as she has taken up other courses of interest, but had she carried on, she would be level 2 qualified at the age of 15.
As for insurance..Im sure there are providers out there that offer it, its just finding them. Good on the girl for getting out there and having the confidence to go it alone and do something in this current hard economic situation!
xx
No one said it was only for underachievers. I stated at my school these courses were only available for pupils at foundation level. They actually had to attend the learning support section of the school to be offered them. Others stated that their schools were similar.
 

ProperPrincess

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Schools in Wales offer these courses also. I personally think they should be concentrating on their maths and sciences and English first but that's a matter of opinion. When I was in high school I wasn't allowed to take art, woodwork or child development because I was in a higher academic set! I think kids need an all round education before they go and find a trade or profession! Of my daughter came home and told me she would be doing nails instead of an extra science award for example... I would not be pleased! X
 

geeg

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There is a girl in Harrogate (Only 17) who is a CND Master Technician, has her own salon business and has just won the Young Entrepreneur of the Year Award! It happens! :lol:
 

Rinn

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yes there was an article about her in scratch. fair play to her. imagine what she'll be doing in another 10 years.
 

lea2721

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There is a girl in Harrogate (Only 17) who is a CND Master Technician, has her own salon business and has just won the Young Entrepreneur of the Year Award! It happens! :lol:
WOW !! Thats amazing good on her im sure she will have a great career ahead of her

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lea2721

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Schools in Wales offer these courses also. I personally think they should be concentrating on their maths and sciences and English first but that's a matter of opinion. When I was in high school I wasn't allowed to take art, woodwork or child development because I was in a higher academic set! I think kids need an all round education before they go and find a trade or profession! Of my daughter came home and told me she would be doing nails instead of an extra science award for example... I would not be pleased! X
See i disagree with you there as i dont think its the be all and end all yes would be nice if they wanted to study more academically but its fact some children just are not interested in academic subjects or find it difficult etc.. And to be hounest just look at some of the most richist people alan sugar richard brandson for example never took an exam in there life some times i think children well some children prefer more hands on learning which is why a lot of schools now offer these in partnership with colleges and from what i hear now is that not just for the under acheivers etc.. But yes regarding the 15year old girl im i agree with post of the posts that yes she could be trained and either way at least shes trying to do something constructive i think good on her x

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olabecee

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As most insurance companies require written parental consent for an under-16 yr old to have nail extensions applied, I find it confusing that it's possible to train and get insured to actually do the applying!

For all the same reasons that an under 16 should need parental consent to have them applied.

All the handling and decanting and disposing of potentially hazardous chemicals?
Is that really going to be ok?


I'm not saying it is or it isn't, but it's hard to understand the logic on the one hand of not validating a tech's insurance if she does extensions on an under 16, and then insuring perhaps that same under-16 year old to do them on other people.

Crazy. (And an interesting thread!!)
Jazzmin Smedley surely has insurance. I found this out as one of my clients daughter is really interested in nails, infact, she's self taught and is really amazing and she's only 15 as well. I spoke to her about doing it the right and professional way and I made insurance enquiries on her behalf and Georgie told me it cost 250 pounds a year for insurance. Seems quite reasonable to me considering its high risk. Hope that clears the notion that a 15 year old cannot be insured. Thanks.

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blossom

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Jazzmin Smedley surely has insurance. I found this out as one of my clients daughter is really interested in nails, infact, she's self taught and is really amazing and she's only 15 as well. I spoke to her about doing it the right and professional way and I made insurance enquiries on her behalf and Georgie told me it cost 250 pounds a year for insurance. Seems quite reasonable to me considering its high risk. Hope that clears the notion that a 15 year old cannot be insured. Thanks.

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Oh, I wasn't questioning whether it was possible for a 15 year old to get insurance.

Just the contradictory attitudes insurance companies have regarding minors.
 

ChicBeauty4

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Good for you. If my daugYhters...or son, wanted to do the same, I would definitely encourage them. How long ago did you do your training.I am assuming you finished school...do you work for yourself or as an employee :) xx

I did it 11 years ago now, I managed a few salons and now I just work for myself.
 

MissKirsty

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Is this something that happens in England? I've never heard of any type of beauty course being offered on the Scottish curriculum. I would of killed to do beauty at school!
They do acctually do it in Scotland. Some of the college offer a beauty higher so they go to school and do day release and college or I know of some schools that have had a state of the art salon for hair and beauty built with in the high school! Really good way to get started plus I would have loved to have that oppertunity at school! xx
 

ProperPrincess

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See i disagree with you there as i dont think its the be all and end all yes would be nice if they wanted to study more academically but its fact some children just are not interested in academic subjects or find it difficult etc.. And to be hounest just look at some of the most richist people alan sugar richard brandson for example never took an exam in there life some times i think children well some children prefer more hands on learning which is why a lot of schools now offer these in partnership with colleges and from what i hear now is that not just for the under acheivers etc.. But yes regarding the 15year old girl im i agree with post of the posts that yes she could be trained and either way at least shes trying to do something constructive i think good on her x

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I personally think nail techs and many of us in this industry can only benefit from basic science, math and English. Alongside other academic subjects.

Business wise these children would benefit with a foundation education.

I also think due to the age these courses are aimed at in high schools they can and will more than likely be used as a "way out" of more conventional learning. There will be exceptions, of course there will. I'm sure a few will go onto successful careers but what if they don't? What will they have to fall back on.

I answered as a mother and a professional. I wouldn't accept or allow my child to complete a school beauty course. Sorry if you disagree and apologies if I offend but I expect my children and I wish all children to have a vast range of academic education before deciding on a trade or profession. X
 

evangelinegrace

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I agree with ProperPrincess. The amount of incorrect science going on in these forums is worrying.

The requirements to do Level 2 beauty at the college where I used to live are 4 GCSEs at Grade D. For Level 1 there are no requirements... Unfortunately this attracts people who can't/won't do anything else along with those with those who genuinely have a passion for the industry.

Unfortunately, that is one of the reasons the beauty industry has so little credibility, despite there being so many with brains, creativity and business sense. Such a shame.
 
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