Pedicure education?

Hello salon geek members I'm Sara and only just found this forum and so far I see so many of you supporting one and other and giving great advice which I think is just amazing. So I thought i would kindly see if I could ask for some feedback and any thoughts you may have on my idea?

First of all I hope this is ok to post on here as I am still very shiny and new. So please tell me if I should post elsewhere?

So before I go on I think it's worth telling you a little about me....
I started my career as a nail technician and beauty therapist many moons ago and had a successful nail salon which I loved. Pedicures were my favourite treatment and I would always be on to the latest product/tool that would help remove the hard skin my clients often had. Believe me i tried them all and was not really satisfied. To cut a long story short in 2015 i trained and qualified as a Foot Health Practitioner and I now run and own a very successful foot clinic. I no longer carry out nail or beauty treatments. My clinic now focusses on treating and diagnosing foot health problems with my lovely patients.

I'm now in a position where by I now want to share my knowledge with beauty therapists so they can safely offer more effective pedicures that I once dreamnt of back in my salon.
I have designed a 1 day course for beauty therapists to safely use a surgical blade to remove callus/hard skin.

The course is pending approval/accreditation by CPD and a list of insurers are available. I am also qualified to educate in this subject.

So I thought i would ask on here for any feedback on my idea and where you think it is something that therapists would be interested in ?
Thank you in advance
 

ciderella71

Well-Known Member
Personally this isn’t something I’d be interested in as I don’t wish to carry out invasive treatments like this and if clients asked for more than callus removal service using lotions and filing then I’d refer them to a podiatrist.
Best of luck with it and I hope you get plenty of interest.
 

RosieR

Well-Known Member
If I could turn the clock back by 15 years i would have loved it. I have a very busy pedicure client base and I love feet too. Others may think me strange...don't like smelly feet but then who does? Feet need a treat, and pampering, but I leave the cutting to the specialists. Your suggestion however is not for me now , I am off in a different direction.

You have loads of really useful knowledge and I think you may have something there.

Margaret Dabbs has a very good "Medical Pedicure" treatment ....charges a fortune and it's got a good following . The salons are high end, and I there is one in Alderley Edge.
So there is clearly a need by select therapists.

You have nothing to lose by setting up , so give it a chance.

All the best x
 
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Flash2009

New Member
it takes 3 years full time degree training to become a Podiatrist for a reason !!!!!
 

Fluffpinkkitten

New Member
Seriously, is this a joke?
You've done a "course" which sits outside of standardised training and qualifications... currently a BSc (Hons) degree...so you've essentially dodged all the standardised training and qualifications expected of a health professional registered with the HCPC ...and you now want to teach???! Are you for real?
You are neither doing yourself or anyone you treat and hopefully to God not teach ...any favours. Rules and regulations in healthcare are there for a reason ...you cannot even pretend to diagnose and treat after a 2 week course!!!
 

Katie Perry

New Member
As a Podiatrist of some considerable experience (both in NHS and Private practice) I have serious concerns about this venture which if feel is blurring the lines between beauty therapy and a medical treatment.

Callus is a symptom, not a disease and promoting a 'cut-and-come-again' approach in isolation is, IMO, not ethical.

Hyperkaratosis/callus/corns, call them what you like, are pathologies (skin disorder).
Histologically, changes occur including increased local fibroblast activity, elongation of the rete pegs and thickening of the stratum spinosum. Causes can be due many reasons including congenital and hereditary disorders, mechanical forces, acquired disease and infections, etc.

In my world, any dermatological podiatric treatment (which includes no treatment) is percursed by thorough assessment of med history, physical examination, assessment of foot function and, if required, further investigation. Only then can an effective treatment plan, according to the individual patient, be formulated.
This could include not only debridement but orthotic presription, footwear modification (via an orthotist), patient education and, in extreme cases, surgical intervention by a podiatric or orthopaedic surgeon..

IMO anyone who seeks paid treatment for a medical condition needs to be told ;
a. what the condition is
b. how it was caused
c. what can be done to stop it happening in the future or how it can be managed.

To provide effective patient care, one needs to be able to think and react to new problems; beating them before they start if you can. This is the difference, in my opinion, between the levels of training for the general practitioner in Podiatry and the FHP. Having the evidence base, the education to understand the evidence and the honed practical skills.

True, I don't know the content of FHP courses but I think we have a pretty good idea that such a short course ( often 12 distance leaning modules and about a week's practical training) does not provide an adequate learning outcome to provide effecive care and I do not know of any FHP who has the underpinning knowledge to deliver the comprehensive level of service that a patient deserves and certainly not enough to teach others.
 

Flash2009

New Member
Seriously, is this a joke?
You've done a "course" which sits outside of standardised training and qualifications... currently a BSc (Hons) degree...so you've essentially dodged all the standardised training and qualifications expected of a health professional registered with the HCPC ...and you now want to teach???! Are you for real?
You are neither doing yourself or anyone you treat and hopefully to God not teach ...any favours. Rules and regulations in healthcare are there for a reason ...you cannot even pretend to diagnose and treat after a 2 week course!!!
it takes 3 years full time degree training to become a Podiatrist for a reason !!!!!
As a Podiatrist of some considerable experience (both in NHS and Private practice) I have serious concerns about this venture which if feel is blurring the lines between beauty therapy and a medical treatment.

Callus is a symptom, not a disease and promoting a 'cut-and-come-again' approach in isolation is, IMO, not ethical.

Hyperkaratosis/callus/corns, call them what you like, are pathologies (skin disorder).
Histologically, changes occur including increased local fibroblast activity, elongation of the rete pegs and thickening of the stratum spinosum. Causes can be due many reasons including congenital and hereditary disorders, mechanical forces, acquired disease and infections, etc.

In my world, any dermatological podiatric treatment (which includes no treatment) is percursed by thorough assessment of med history, physical examination, assessment of foot function and, if required, further investigation. Only then can an effective treatment plan, according to the individual patient, be formulated.
This could include not only debridement but orthotic presription, footwear modification (via an orthotist), patient education and, in extreme cases, surgical intervention by a podiatric or orthopaedic surgeon..

IMO anyone who seeks paid treatment for a medical condition needs to be told ;
a. what the condition is
b. how it was caused
c. what can be done to stop it happening in the future or how it can be managed.

To provide effective patient care, one needs to be able to think and react to new problems; beating them before they start if you can. This is the difference, in my opinion, between the levels of training for the general practitioner in Podiatry and the FHP. Having the evidence base, the education to understand the evidence and the honed practical skills.

True, I don't know the content of FHP courses but I think we have a pretty good idea that such a short course ( often 12 distance leaning modules and about a week's practical training) does not provide an adequate learning outcome to provide effecive care and I do not know of any FHP who has the underpinning knowledge to deliver the comprehensive level of service that a patient deserves and certainly not enough to teach others.
Couldnt have put it better myself. Thanks. The idea of a FHP doing a 1 day course to teach beauticians to use a medical scalpel for this is unbelievable. Litigation waiting to happen I would say.
 

Katie Perry

New Member
As a postscript to my previous posting - there are some callus-like skin problems that should be minimally debrided (if at all) such as punctate keratodermas and considerable skill is required if scalpel-work is to be considered ;
Please see the following (Courtesy of Dermnet);

Other conditions needing podiatric invervention include pitted keratolysis and pedopompholyx.

I cannot envisage the differential diagnosis of these (and other) skin disorders being taught in one day.
 
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