Bad supermarket shampoo

Laura28x

Member
Which shampoo's are bad.

Obvious ones - head '& shoulders - colour stripper

Pantene & Tres eme - silicon coaters.

Anymore anyone else knows of?
 

lalalaurz

Active Member
When ur a pro hun they're all bad... My clients used to ask me all the time which OTC products would I recommend I would always say to steer clear of them all. There are plenty of reasonably priced pro products if budget is a problem - Osmo being my fave :) - so with that in mind, I now buy pro products to sell on to my clients and I've got every single one of them off OTC stuff now, took a while but I got there in the end! X
 

Laura28x

Member
That's the thing, in actual fact, they are much more concentrated that you use half the amount! And can work out more cost effective, but people don't seem to realise this! X
 

lalalaurz

Active Member
I know! The best way to prove it is to invest in a few smaller bottles of pro stuff and just use it on ur clients... They'll love it plus u can show them how little u use :) x
 

Nearlyme

Banned
I had a client on Saturday say "oh ive run out of that shampoo you sold me a year ago but Im not paying 8.90 for a new one"
Peronally I think 8.90 ocer tge course of a year is better value then £3 every other week

Sent from my GT-I9505 using SalonGeek mobile app
 

Rachul123

Well-Known Member
I think its confusing for consumers because they don't know, and on the adverts they sell them as award winning salon shampoos..
Afew of mine have been buying macadamia oil products from primark, what is it?
'oh i got some of that macadamia oil you use, its was £2!'
'Erm then its not what i use is it...' :)
 

littlekate

Active Member
So for all of us non hairdressers reading this can you explain what's bad about OTC shampoos as I'd really like to know as no hairdressers ever told me before!
 

Missy106

Well-Known Member
So for all of us non hairdressers reading this can you explain what's bad about OTC shampoos as I'd really like to know as no hairdressers ever told me before!
A lot of OTC brand contains sulphates, which are bad for your hair, and can strip the colour out. Also if they contain silicon (pantene, tresemme) they coat your hair in a layer of silicon which yes gives it a lovely shine, but will stop colours from taking as good. Also they contain a lot of detergents, which help the shampoo froth up in your hair , but you need to use quite a lot. Professional shampoos dont contain this, u need to use less, which makes them last longer, and they do exactly what they say on the tin . I would never use a OTC on my hair as when i have done in the past you can tell diffrence straight away. Hope this helps. Lucia xxx
 

Yummy Mummy's

Member
Which shampoo would you recommend then? Hairdressers sell all sorts...
 

Amberjox

Member
When ur a pro hun they're all bad... My clients used to ask me all the time which OTC products would I recommend I would always say to steer clear of them all. There are plenty of reasonably priced pro products if budget is a problem - Osmo being my fave :) - so with that in mind, I now buy pro products to sell on to my clients and I've got every single one of them off OTC stuff now, took a while but I got there in the end! X
I dont really like Osmo though but its true you get what you pay for!!! Is tresemme really a salon brand? xx
 

Missy106

Well-Known Member
I dont really like Osmo though but its true you get what you pay for!!! Is tresemme really a salon brand? xx
Tre semme used to be a salon brand years ago (on the cheaper scale of salon brand) then they made it supermarket accessable, lowered the price and added lots of nasties into it! Hence the price now, what £4 or so for a massive bottle.... X
 

shezybabes

Member
Can anyone tell me if Tigi shampoo is any good?
 

Missy106

Well-Known Member
Can anyone tell me if Tigi shampoo is any good?
Tigi is ok, i personally arnt very keen on them. Loreal professional and kerastase are brilliant. Also if you like natural ones, aveda, but i wouldnt use this on myself. Lucia xx
 

DONSLJ

Member
Can anyone tell me if Tigi shampoo is any good?
Yep I'd like to know this too as its what I use and really like? Are OTC conditioners the same principle? Thanks
 

faerififi

Active Member
Sulfate free shampoo is the best regardless of what pro brand it is. Ive said it on here loads but the amount of clients ive switched to sulfate free with bleached hair who before had tangling and dryness, a month later and you can easily get a comb through it when wet and the condition is much better. I use kitoko, have used tigi but meh, conditioner is quite weak mostly and i had one of my clients complain about the dumb blonde branding when i bought her some ha.
 

aronne

Member
i always tell clients that the best ones are salon ones, they are concentrated and can last upto 6 months. depending how often you wash your hair and size of bottle you can save heaps of money!!! on average in NZ they range from $25 and up. if you look at it as buying one every 6 months its only about $9 for both a quality shampoo AND conditioner!!!!
one rule i say is would you go to the supermarket to buy prescription medicine? then why go there to buy shampoo and conditioner
 

adamlea87

Well-Known Member
Any shampoo whether professional or store bought will contain the same types of ingredients:

Surfactants are the cleansers in shampoos. Everybody knows that oil and water doesn't mix, so they use surfactant molecules which have both a hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups. The hydrophobic part of the molecule is attracted to oils, whilst the hydrophilic end is attracted to water, allowing the oils to become suspended in the water and washed out.

If someone has a particularly dry scalp/ hair they might choose to use a shampoo with more gentle surfactants or sulphate-free, which will not remove as much oils as other surfactants.

People often blame shampoos for colour fade, or claim that dandruff shampoos fade hair colour, however the effect of surfactants on haircolour is negligible, it is water alone that is almost entirely responsible for colour fade during shampooing. When the hair is wet, water enters the cortex, drawing out the colour molecules with it. You can find the same surfactants in professional and store bought products.

The second component of shampoos are the conditioning elements. 'Cleansing' or 'volume' shampoos will not contain as much conditioning ingredients as shampoos for dry or coloured hair as they can weigh the hair down. Hair is naturally surrounded by a hydrophobic film of fatty acids that repel water of the surface to control moisture and lubricate the hair. When the hair is colored this water-proofing film is removed, water can more freely enter the hair shaft, resulting in more colour being water out of the hair during shampooing. This is replaced by conditioning ingredients such as cationic polymers which are positively charged, and are attracted to the negative charges in hair, and silicones that will also help to smooth the hair surface.
You can find the same silicones and other conditioning agents in professional and store bought products.

Finally shampoos will contain cosmetic ingredients such as thickeners that may give the illusion of a more concentrated product. Consumers with oily scalp often prefer more transparent shampoos, whilst those with dry who use conditioning shampoos prefer products with a thicker 'richer' texture.
Along with thickeners products may also contain opacifiers to give the product a more milky texture, added colours and perfumes.
This is all related to the 'halo effect' which means if the users likes the smell, texture, colour etc. of the products they will perceive it as doing a better job than say, an unscented shampoo in a plain bottle.
 

lalalaurz

Active Member
Any shampoo whether professional or store bought will contain the same types of ingredients:

Surfactants are the cleansers in shampoos. Everybody knows that oil and water doesn't mix, so they use surfactant molecules which have both a hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups. The hydrophobic part of the molecule is attracted to oils, whilst the hydrophilic end is attracted to water, allowing the oils to become suspended in the water and washed out.

If someone has a particularly dry scalp/ hair they might choose to use a shampoo with more gentle surfactants or sulphate-free, which will not remove as much oils as other surfactants.

People often blame shampoos for colour fade, or claim that dandruff shampoos fade hair colour, however the effect of surfactants on haircolour is negligible, it is water alone that is almost entirely responsible for colour fade during shampooing. When the hair is wet, water enters the cortex, drawing out the colour molecules with it. You can find the same surfactants in professional and store bought products.

The second component of shampoos are the conditioning elements. 'Cleansing' or 'volume' shampoos will not contain as much conditioning ingredients as shampoos for dry or coloured hair as they can weigh the hair down. Hair is naturally surrounded by a hydrophobic film of fatty acids that repel water of the surface to control moisture and lubricate the hair. When the hair is colored this water-proofing film is removed, water can more freely enter the hair shaft, resulting in more colour being water out of the hair during shampooing. This is replaced by conditioning ingredients such as cationic polymers which are positively charged, and are attracted to the negative charges in hair, and silicones that will also help to smooth the hair surface.
You can find the same silicones and other conditioning agents in professional and store bought products.

Finally shampoos will contain cosmetic ingredients such as thickeners that may give the illusion of a more concentrated product. Consumers with oily scalp often prefer more transparent shampoos, whilst those with dry who use conditioning shampoos prefer products with a thicker 'richer' texture.
Along with thickeners products may also contain opacifiers to give the product a more milky texture, added colours and perfumes.
This is all related to the 'halo effect' which means if the users likes the smell, texture, colour etc. of the products they will perceive it as doing a better job than say, an unscented shampoo in a plain bottle.
So are you saying that over the counter products are the same as pro products? All of what you said sounds very scientific and makes sense but does it mean that we are all just being conned by the market?? Because there's no doubt that pro products are more concentrated and last longer so are you saing that's the only difference between the two? :)
 

NiCshairstudio

Active Member
Any shampoo whether professional or store bought will contain the same types of ingredients:

Surfactants are the cleansers in shampoos. Everybody knows that oil and water doesn't mix, so they use surfactant molecules which have both a hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups. The hydrophobic part of the molecule is attracted to oils, whilst the hydrophilic end is attracted to water, allowing the oils to become suspended in the water and washed out.

If someone has a particularly dry scalp/ hair they might choose to use a shampoo with more gentle surfactants or sulphate-free, which will not remove as much oils as other surfactants.

People often blame shampoos for colour fade, or claim that dandruff shampoos fade hair colour, however the effect of surfactants on haircolour is negligible, it is water alone that is almost entirely responsible for colour fade during shampooing. When the hair is wet, water enters the cortex, drawing out the colour molecules with it. You can find the same surfactants in professional and store bought products.

The second component of shampoos are the conditioning elements. 'Cleansing' or 'volume' shampoos will not contain as much conditioning ingredients as shampoos for dry or coloured hair as they can weigh the hair down. Hair is naturally surrounded by a hydrophobic film of fatty acids that repel water of the surface to control moisture and lubricate the hair. When the hair is colored this water-proofing film is removed, water can more freely enter the hair shaft, resulting in more colour being water out of the hair during shampooing. This is replaced by conditioning ingredients such as cationic polymers which are positively charged, and are attracted to the negative charges in hair, and silicones that will also help to smooth the hair surface.
You can find the same silicones and other conditioning agents in professional and store bought products.

Finally shampoos will contain cosmetic ingredients such as thickeners that may give the illusion of a more concentrated product. Consumers with oily scalp often prefer more transparent shampoos, whilst those with dry who use conditioning shampoos prefer products with a thicker 'richer' texture.
Along with thickeners products may also contain opacifiers to give the product a more milky texture, added colours and perfumes.
This is all related to the 'halo effect' which means if the users likes the smell, texture, colour etc. of the products they will perceive it as doing a better job than say, an unscented shampoo in a plain bottle.
This is a lovely googled piece of work however factually incorrect to say both supermarket and professional products contain the same ingredients!

If this was the case, we would use any old thing to save us money too!!

OTC products are made cheaper by bill and Ben who also make washing up liquid, know nothing about hair, it needs to throw, clean and smell nice, throw it in a bottle boom £2 thank you sir, salon pro products are made by hairdressers for hairdressers and have your hair at the forefront of their mind at all times, to do the job at hand without ruining you hair in the process. Helping colours take better, last longer and hair naturally shiny rather than pretend silicone shiny.

It is true silicone is in most shampoos however the type is what matter, cheap OTC prods is plastic silicone that builds up and cause dullness over time. Salon pro if they have it are water soluble and necessary for the job at hand and wash back off the minute water touches it. Unlike the cheap plastic coating that doesn't.
 

Missy106

Well-Known Member
This is a lovely googled piece of work however factually incorrect to say both supermarket and professional products contain the same ingredients!

If this was the case, we would use any old thing to save us money too!!

OTC products are made cheaper by bill and Ben who also make washing up liquid, know nothing about hair, it needs to throw, clean and smell nice, throw it in a bottle boom £2 thank you sir, salon pro products are made by hairdressers for hairdressers and have your hair at the forefront of their mind at all times, to do the job at hand without ruining you hair in the process. Helping colours take better, last longer and hair naturally shiny rather than pretend silicone shiny.

It is true silicone is in most shampoos however the type is what matter, cheap OTC prods is plastic silicone that builds up and cause dullness over time. Salon pro if they have it are water soluble and necessary for the job at hand and wash back off the minute water touches it. Unlike the cheap plastic coating that doesn't.
Yes i agree, OTC and salon products are nothing alike.. As we would all be using the £2 supermarket brands and saving ourself a fortune! Lol. Lucia xx
 
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