Brave weekend - cross contamination with hairbrushes!

Sassy Hassy

Well-Known Member
Okay all of us on the Nail geek, and even the Skin Geek, get hung up on sanitation between clients and what we should do. I just wondered what the hair geeks are SUPPOSED to do (ie what they were trained to do) and maybe what they REALLY do.

The reason I ask this is that I get a really REALLY itchy scalp and it turns out it is probably a form of cradle cap which, correct me if I'm wrong, is a fungal infection. Now if we mention fungal in the nail or skin forums we go bananas with our sanitation. But when did I last see a hair messer sanitising a hairbrush between clients?

So my silly question for brave weekend is "can I be catching this fungal thingy off my stylists hair brush due to cross contamination?"
 

lotus blossom

Well-Known Member
god question sass!!!
i have always wanted to know the answer to this!!
 

Bagpuss

Sleepy Geek Zzzzzzzz
from my days as a hairdresser many years ago...we used to wash all the brushes in warm soapy water....remove all traces of hair and then spray with a chlor-i spray type thing....

this was only done at then end of each day though....so i guess if the same brush was used on say 8 clients during that day then i guess you could be passing things on......yukky
 

-sophisticutz-

Active Member
I would be very surprised if you caught cradle cap from a brush :eek: its not infectious and only a skin condition. We have barbicide in the salon for combs and brushes and I de-hair my brushes after each client and they get washed in hot soapy water as and when they need doing (although never left longer than a week). Towels are clean for each and every client (believe me a climb everest every night with our towels) and gowns are washed weekly or sooner if needed. My salon is cleaned top to bottom EVERY night with hot soapy water.

We dont get as many icky clients as you nail/skin people *lol* and the risk of broken skin, blood and cross contamination is significantly lower in hair than in the beauty industry. Although in my time I have come across some pretty gross people in both industries :confused:
 

Hope

Well-Known Member
So following on from Sassy's Q. What is cradle cap, why do people get it and how do you get rid of it?
 

minky

Well-Known Member
So following on from Sassy's Q. What is cradle cap, why do people get it and how do you get rid of it?



H I it is called this in adults and is not contagious

What is seborrhoeic dermatitis and who gets it?
Seborrhoeic dermatitis is a type of skin inflammation. It mainly occurs in young adults and teenagers. About 1 in 25 adults between the ages of 18 and 40 develop this condition. It is more common in men than women. Some babies have a similar condition that usually clears within a few months. (See separate leaflet called 'Seborrhoeic Dermatitis and Cradle Cap in Babies'.) It does not occur in children older than about 8-9 months.
The exact cause is not known. A yeast germ (similar to a fungal germ) called Malassezia furfur (previously called Pityrosporum ovale) is involved. However, it is not just a simple skin infection and it is not contagious (you cannot 'catch' this condition from others). This yeast germ lives in the sebum (oil) of human skin in most adults. In most people it does no harm. But some people seem to 'react' to this germ in some way which causes inflammation.What is the treatment for seborrhoeic dermatitis?

Commonly used treatments include the following.

* An antifungal (anti-yeast) shampoo such as ketoconazole 2% is used to treat the scalp, eyebrows and other hairy areas. This kills the yeast germ and the skin then usually returns to normal. Use the shampoo 2-3 times a week (and use normal shampoo the rest of the time). Leave the shampoo on for about five minutes before rinsing off.
* An antifungal cream is used to treat other areas. Apply the cream to affected areas once or twice daily, depending on the type of cream prescribed.

It often takes 2-4 weeks to completely clear the dandruff or rash. Keep using the treatment for a few days after the dandruff or rash have cleared.

Other treatments which may be used include the following.

* A 'normal' anti-dandruff shampoo that contains zinc pyrithione or coal tar may clear dandruff in mild cases if used regularly.
* A mild steroid cream and/or steroid scalp lotion is sometimes advised for a week or so in addition to an antifungal cream or shampoo. This is used if the skin or scalp is badly inflamed. Steroid creams and lotions dampen inflammation which reduces the redness and itch.
* A scale softener is sometimes advised for the scalp to 'lift the scale' if dandruff is severe. This is in addition to the antifungal shampoo.
* A course of antifungal tablets may be needed if the condition affects many areas of skin, or is not clearing with an antifungal cream.
* Phototherapy (light treatment) with ultraviolet B is sometimes used in severe cases.

The condition goes if the yeast germ is cleared from the skin by the above treatments. However, the sebum is a natural place for the yeast germ to live. In many cases, the number of yeast germs gradually rises again on the skin after finishing a course of treatment. So, in many cases the condition tends to recur some weeks or months after finishing a course of treatment. Each episode can be treated as it occurs. However, if you have frequent episodes you may wish to consider using treatment to prevent the condition from recurring.

How can I prevent seborrhoeic dermatitis from recurring?

Once the symptoms have gone with treatment, the following may help to keep the condition from recurring.

* For the scalp - use an antifungal shampoo such as ketoconazole 2% once every 1-2 weeks. Leave on the scalp for five minutes before rinsing. (Use a normal shampoo at other times.)


.
 

-sophisticutz-

Active Member
H I it is called this in adults and is not contagious

What is seborrhoeic dermatitis and who gets it?
Seborrhoeic dermatitis is a type of skin inflammation. It mainly occurs in young adults and teenagers. About 1 in 25 adults between the ages of 18 and 40 develop this condition. It is more common in men than women. Some babies have a similar condition that usually clears within a few months. (See separate leaflet called 'Seborrhoeic Dermatitis and Cradle Cap in Babies'.) It does not occur in children older than about 8-9 months.
The exact cause is not known. A yeast germ (similar to a fungal germ) called Malassezia furfur (previously called Pityrosporum ovale) is involved. However, it is not just a simple skin infection and it is not contagious (you cannot 'catch' this condition from others). This yeast germ lives in the sebum (oil) of human skin in most adults. In most people it does no harm. But some people seem to 'react' to this germ in some way which causes inflammation.What is the treatment for seborrhoeic dermatitis?

Commonly used treatments include the following.

* An antifungal (anti-yeast) shampoo such as ketoconazole 2% is used to treat the scalp, eyebrows and other hairy areas. This kills the yeast germ and the skin then usually returns to normal. Use the shampoo 2-3 times a week (and use normal shampoo the rest of the time). Leave the shampoo on for about five minutes before rinsing off.
* An antifungal cream is used to treat other areas. Apply the cream to affected areas once or twice daily, depending on the type of cream prescribed.

It often takes 2-4 weeks to completely clear the dandruff or rash. Keep using the treatment for a few days after the dandruff or rash have cleared.

Other treatments which may be used include the following.

* A 'normal' anti-dandruff shampoo that contains zinc pyrithione or coal tar may clear dandruff in mild cases if used regularly.
* A mild steroid cream and/or steroid scalp lotion is sometimes advised for a week or so in addition to an antifungal cream or shampoo. This is used if the skin or scalp is badly inflamed. Steroid creams and lotions dampen inflammation which reduces the redness and itch.
* A scale softener is sometimes advised for the scalp to 'lift the scale' if dandruff is severe. This is in addition to the antifungal shampoo.
* A course of antifungal tablets may be needed if the condition affects many areas of skin, or is not clearing with an antifungal cream.
* Phototherapy (light treatment) with ultraviolet B is sometimes used in severe cases.

The condition goes if the yeast germ is cleared from the skin by the above treatments. However, the sebum is a natural place for the yeast germ to live. In many cases, the number of yeast germs gradually rises again on the skin after finishing a course of treatment. So, in many cases the condition tends to recur some weeks or months after finishing a course of treatment. Each episode can be treated as it occurs. However, if you have frequent episodes you may wish to consider using treatment to prevent the condition from recurring.

How can I prevent seborrhoeic dermatitis from recurring?

Once the symptoms have gone with treatment, the following may help to keep the condition from recurring.

* For the scalp - use an antifungal shampoo such as ketoconazole 2% once every 1-2 weeks. Leave on the scalp for five minutes before rinsing. (Use a normal shampoo at other times.)


.

Just what I was going to say *lol* :)
 

minky

Well-Known Member
Hi
I use sterilene by comby In between clients this is a broad spectrum fine mist disinfectant that you pump spray on smells a bit like steret wipes

It says on the back of the bottle that it protects from : exposed aids ,hepatitis B, herpes salmonella, boils, dandruff, thrush,and other micro organisms ,
takes two seconds and everyone gets clean instruments brushes combs ect ,
it is produced especially for brushes and combs scissors ect from most hairdressing outlets ,
The health and safety people like it

Then at the end of the day they get washed in hot soapy water and placed in a uv cabinet
metals and combs can be put in a barbicide solution
if anyone has a contra indication like nits,
I personally throw that brush away ,
you dont have to do this you can soak it in bleach , but I feel better off buying a new one as it is not that often you get someone with nits
 

Sassy Hassy

Well-Known Member
Wow Minky that's a fab answer thanks!
 

angel fingers

Well-Known Member
one of my daughters used to have seb derm when she was younger, i got her some special shampoo from the doc on prescription. i cant remember what it was called, but you could purchase it without a prescription although it was extremely expensive. it had a sort of coal tar smell to it. i know thats vague, but maybe you could ask your pharmacist.
 

oey

Well-Known Member
Going back to part of Sassy's question, what is the industry standard requirements for:

Cleaning Salon brushes/towels
Washing Salon Towels
Sanitisation of Tools
Skin Tests for Colours etc.

I have always wondered this too Sass and think that these procedure requirements should be made clearer than they are at the minute.

p.s. good thread Sass
 
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