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Equipment Sterlisation

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Bryony

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Hi all,

I'm new to this site and all this nail stuff. I'm currently still training but have one problem......
We have been told not to use Barbicide to disinfect equipment as it is carcinogenic, fine, but I'm having MAJOR difficulty finding an alternative. I can find various disinfectant solutions but when I mentioned this to my tutor she said we should be sterilising tools, not just disinfecting. She has mentioned Virkon but I can't find this anywhere and when I searched on the web it was at sites devoted to farmers and vets!
Today I have seen in Nails mag something called Gigaseot FF from LCN which looks like it will do the job but it's expensive.

I'd be grateful for any input

Thanks,
B
 

Little Angel

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hiya

im pretty sure sam did and article on this subject about the dif between ster and dis so if you do a search that will help you or you could check out the designer nails web site. They have and NVQ section and it covers this subject.
I Disenfect i dont sterilise really. I use Mikrozoid from LCN for my implements, desk and lamp. It is worth spending a little money for peace of mind i think creative do one called cholispray. (wouldnt swear to it though! lol)
good luck with your course
 

Bryony

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Thanks Tracy,

I have looked over a few previous posts and see Chlor-I-Spray is a popular choice. I was thinking of getting some and using as for a quick spray of equipment before use (in front of the client seems a good idea!) but got the impression I should be also using a soaking solution between clients/overnight??

B
 

Debs

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If you wash your implements and then spray them with Chlor-i-spray thats all you should need in the salon.
As long as its a hospital grade disinfectant it`ll be strong enough for what you need
 

loo

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Surely it is okay to use Barbicide if you wash your implements after and wear disposable gloves-isn't it? Thats worrying otherwise as I never new it was a Carcinogenic :eek: What are you views on the product????
 

The Geek

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Ha. Carcenogenic? Seriously? Well, it may be, but so far none of my implements have had to undergoe Chemo yet.

As was mentioned, any Hospital Grade Disinfectant is more than sufficient. You only need to sterilize if you run perform surgery or other invasive proceedures.

Sanitise all abrasives and tools between clients with soap and water, then either spray with something like Chlorispray and let stand dry, or submerge in a disinfectant like Barbacide or Marvacide (double check your abrasives... many are not submergable).

My only suggestion is to avoid Phenolic disinfectants. These are designed to kill TB, sadly, TB is an airborne transmitted disease and has never been passed via impliments.

Hope this helps.
 

Little Angel

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bbai said:
Thanks Tracy,

I have looked over a few previous posts and see Chlor-I-Spray is a popular choice. I was thinking of getting some and using as for a quick spray of equipment before use (in front of the client seems a good idea!) but got the impression I should be also using a soaking solution between clients/overnight??

B
we dont soak any more, the sprays are very effective. I wash with anti bac soap rinse and dry. I always disenfect before i use anything and i do it on some kitchen towel in front of my client. I think there a quite a few sprays around and they may seem an expense but if you take into account you wont be buying any soaking solution it evens out. I find that soaking wrecks my metal implements and not many files are soakable. Dont forget to dry your tools dont let them air dry.

Hope this helps
 

yogacat

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I don't know a great deal about this,but have been looking into it lately. What about autoclaves and uv lamps?
Using heat to kill bugs involves no chemicals and i understand is more effective and cheap to run anyway.
 

MissNailPro

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Hello everyone, I have to agree with Sam here...

We do not need to sterilize!! We do not need to because we are NOT
in an environment that needs it. The medical field does. Not us.

And also we CAN'T sterilize unless we have proper sterilizing equipment and procedures.....

"steam under pressure(autoclaving), dry heat
ovens,"(not uv sanitizers), "low temperature gas (ethylene oxide, and
liquid chemical sterilants." (Liquid sterilants are primarily used for
delicate instruments which cannot withstand high temperature and
gases. Gaseous and dry heat sterilizers are used primarily for
sterilization of medical instruments.)

.....and 99% of us DO NOT. And also you cannot sterilize your area. So your items are sterilized then you put them on your table, they are contaminated again. You touch them with your hands, contaminated. etc. etc. etc.

If you think about it if you have ever had surgery, the doctor is wrapped head to toe, the instruments are etc. We do not work in this type of environment, and we aren't performing surgery.

I do not believe that having an autoclave (or any sterilization device or procedure) and actually using it in any salon is 'good'. It just promotes the fear based marketing out there that we 'should' be sterilizing!

Clients will spread the word (and trust me it will travel like wildfire) that "they" go to a salon that "sterilizes with an autoclave"-- and other clients will think, "hmm, why doesn't my tech (or salon)
use one??"

It's BAD strategy, if you ask me, and will affect our industry SO
negatively- how will we be able to compete with that? How will we be able to professionally answer a client as to why "we don't have one (autoclave) and why we don't sterilize?"

In my opinion, it will make us (the techs without an autoclave) look bad, unprofessional, and not "up-to-par" with a regulation that
doesn't exist!

I certainly fear the day when a client asks me why I don't
sterilize, after all, I don't want to put another tech/salon "down" for using one, but in reality, they are completely unnecessary!

Sanitizing with soap & water, and full immersion in an EPA registered disinfectant or bleach solution (for the proper amount of time), is sufficient to prepare our tools and disinfectable abrasives for use. (A Bleach solution is equal to an EPA registered disinfectant- since it has been approved for use before the existence of the EPA, it is basically 'grandfathered' in and doesn't need an EPA number. --this info from Doug Schoon.)

Forgive me for sounding so 'emotionally upset' about this topic- it is RAMPANT here in the US- magazines and websites are promoting "sterilization in the Salon"- and it's OUTRAGEOUS, ridiculous and downright frustrating!

All I can hope is that we, and those that are recognized in our industry as experts on this situation, are doing whatever possible to silence this ridiculous notion.

PS- I'll join any fight against sterilization - 'sign me up'!!!


I received this information from a class I took with Doug Schoon at the
Chicago Midwest Beauty Show last February- covering sanitization/disinfection
and the guidelines of the Abrasive Safety Task Force:

Placing used implements/files in disinfectant does ABSOLUTELY nothing
(except contaminate your disinfectant!).

Sanitization is the most important step in thoroughly cleaning- it
significantly reduces the number of pathogens on the surface. (So... soap & water first
is a must!)

Disinfection kills pathogens on nonliving, hard surfaces.

-------------------------------------

POROUS ABRASIVES: nail files made of wood, paper or soft materials, buffers,
foot files, sanding bands, etc.

FOR POROUS ABRASIVES, use:
Bleach solution=10 mins. Total submersion, or
Isopropyl Alcohol (70%), or Ethyl Alcohol (90%), both require 15 mins. total
submersion.

***If the porous abrasive 'breaks down' after disinfection, then it is NOT disinfectable.
----------------------------------------
NONPOROUS ABRASIVES: Any metal or glass item.

FOR NONPOROUS ABRASIVES use:
EPA Registered hospital-grade/pseudomonacidal, bactericidal, virucidal,
fungicidal, tuberculocidal disinfectant, OR bleach or alcohol solutions (since
these items have been around since before the EPA Registration of
Disinfectants-they do not need to be 'registered'!)

So ... in all actuality--- you can just use a bleach or alcohol solution in your salon
for ALL surfaces (porous or nonporous)... you don't NEED a separate "EPA
Registered Disinfectant"!

--------------------------------------------
If a file or nonporous item falls apart or 'breaks down' in your sanitize/disinfect
process---- then IT IS NOT disinfectable UNLESS you use ONLY the bleach solution or alcohol
for the required submersion time.
--------------------------------------------

Since Sanitization is the most important step- that's the 'cleaning'- many
wonder
"Why Disinfect?"

1- To give clients piece of mind (all that 'fear based marketing' out there
has given clients the idea that we "need" to disinfect--however there is no
scientific basis for this existing requirement)
2- To prevent spread of colds, flu, fungal & bacterial nail infections

Regarding Disinfectants-
"What kind to use?"

PHENOLICS- Expensive, NO SINK DISPOSAL, item MUST be rinsed after submersion,
NO skin contact (sanitize first, then immerse 10 mins, then rinse, then air
dry, then dry (not air tight) storage.)

QUATS- Cheaper, Sink disposal, NO rinse, NO skin contact (sanitize first,
then immerse 10 mins, then air dry, then dry (not air tight) storage.)

So it is your choice on which type of disinfectant to use!

Please be aware however, if you are using a Phenolic type disinfectant- it is
poisoning our water system if you dispose of it down the drain/toilet.

Easiest & safest way to dispose of phenolics is to pour into kitty litter so
it solidifies, then double trash bag.
(Hate to think how long that takes to break down in a dump)

Oh.. another good tidbit -- Bacteria/Viruses need water to survive!

So there is no 'buildup' of bacteria in acrylic liquid, gel or polish (since
there's no water!)

I loved that class...Doug is so FULL of great info... just had to share!

Have a great day everyone! :biggrin:
 

MissNailPro

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Bryony

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Thank you all for your replies and comments, I'm sure as I go through my training and eventually into the big wide world I'll be asking for more advice!

Anyone else reading this please feel free to add your opinions

Cheers,

B
 

Laura

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bbai said:
Thank you all for your replies and comments, I'm sure as I go through my training and eventually into the big wide world I'll be asking for more advice!

Anyone else reading this please feel free to add your opinions

Cheers,

B
NSI do a really neat steam steriliser which is compact and it takes all implements.... ok, sterilization isn't really necessary but I'd rather be safe than sorry. Just my personal opinion :biggrin:
 

Bryony

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Laura,

Thanks, I've seen these - The Germinator Pro :evil: or something. I did wonder about this but thought steaming metal implements would rust them over time - or do you add some sort of rust inhibitor to the water to prevent (or only delay) this?

I'm still undecided which way to go - I can see peoples arguments about why sterilisation is unnecessary and if you don't have a sterile environment in which to keep sterilised stuff it does seem a bit pointless!

:confused: B
 

Pinkies!

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So sprays dissinfect almost immediately where as some liquids take 10-15 mins??
 

Little Angel

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Hi bbai

If you can get a copy of scratch mag they have an article covering loads of hygene and sanitizing products with prices or check them out on-line
www.scratchmagazine.co.uk
:eek: :eek: ;)
 

Laura

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bbai said:
Laura,

Thanks, I've seen these - The Germinator Pro :evil: or something. I did wonder about this but thought steaming metal implements would rust them over time - or do you add some sort of rust inhibitor to the water to prevent (or only delay) this?

I'm still undecided which way to go - I can see peoples arguments about why sterilisation is unnecessary and if you don't have a sterile environment in which to keep sterilised stuff it does seem a bit pointless!

I understand what you're saying... its just a smaller version of a baby bottle steriliser,(what they don't tell you is that it is actually a toothbrush steriliser) it is s'posed to be safe to leave bottles,dummies etc in them for so many hours.. So I leave the tools in it until I need them(once sterilised)
Unless I'm mistaken, aren't implements made of stainless steel? I'm hoping rust won't be a problem.
I've always got by with disinfection for the last eight years but when I saw this gadget I thought I'd like to try it (Gadget Queen me)
 

Nailsinlondon1

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I follow the sanitisation rules................

I do not preform open nail surgery........
If i was I would sterilize my tools, scrub up to the elbowes with a hard stiff brush, wear my gloves, and get a nursey to hand me my tools......

My clients sit in a nice, comfy chair and do not lay across my naildesk draped in green hospital linen........
Some things can be taken just that bit to far........
And I am with Melissa and Samuel on this one..........
Unless Doug Schoon tells me other wise, I will sanitize and keep to my strict hygiene program..............
 

Anna from Toronto

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I agree with Melissa and Ruth, I think sterile environment is good and mandantory for opereting room but not for salons. (and too costly for salons)

Restaurants wash their untensils in hot water and soap and that's ok....I never saw anyone sterilizing their forks and knives (and people can have sores in their mouth too). If we can eat from table wiped clean and eat with washed cutlery, then disinfecting our tools should be enough.
I wash with hot water and soap the implements after each client and soak them in alcohol as recommended by Health Canada (hospital grade disinfectans are designed for hard surfaces, so I don't use them on files)
To make my life easier I throw away/give to the client my files after each use because I can't be bothered washing them, drying, spraying and the grit is never the same anyway. I use 1 file for 1 service and I get them in bulk, so that's how I save myself little time and hassle ;)

Also I have never seen hairdressers sterilizing their scissors, combs and so on.. :twisted:
 

The Geek

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Anna from Toronto said:
Restaurants wash their untensils in hot water and soap and that's ok....I never saw anyone sterilizing their forks and knives (and people can have sores in their mouth too). If we can eat from table wiped clean and eat with washed cutlery, then disinfecting our tools should be enough.
What a superb analogy :!:
 

yogacat

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I don't have really strong feelings on this. I think that if you wish to sterilise, then ok - if you don't then that's ok too.
I think it could be useful to have sterilisation facilities available "just in case", but not practical if you use it only rarely anyway. I always feel there can't be any harm in erring on the side of caution.
My personal concern is the environment - I wish to use a method of sanitation which has the least environmental impact possible. I would prefer not to use chemical disinfectants as i also feel it is preferable to limit exposure to "unnatural" chemicals as far as possible. I appreciate that this is not likely to be a perspective that is shared by many here.
I would like someone to be able to tell me the most environmentally friendly methods of disinfecting and sanitising equipment. I was thinking about a steamer - maybe one designed for baby bottles or a uv cabinet. How acceptable would Tea Tree be as a sanitising agent? After looking into it a little more i realise that a medical autoclave would not be terribly practical. What are those things with the glass beads that get heated to a very high temperature?
And what on earth do we use to clean foot spas with?!
Thank you for your help.
 
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