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toni

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Hi all,

I got my hands on a Brisa kit and tried it on my sister. When I put the form on her nails and followed all the instructions on the video I had the form in a curve, however her natural nails have a very high natural arch and when you look down on them from the tip they actually look square. They are exactly like mine. I can't push the forms too far under as the skin grows out with the nails.

I also find when I use tips on my nails the tip seems to fan out wider than the rest of the nail.

Anyone had any problems like this or any ideas how to cope with it.

Much appreciated.
 

Little Angel

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Hiya

Have you tried tailoring your form to fit? You do this by taking out the middle before removing it from the backing, and then fit it to the nails and scissor it out until you get a good fit?
 

Mani-fique!

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toni said:
Hi all,

her natural nails have a very high natural arch and when you look down on them from the tip they actually look square. They are exactly like mine. I can't push the forms too far under as the skin grows out with the nails.
I would loooove to know how to solve this as I think this is what is wrong with my mother-in-laws nails when I tried to fit sculpting forms... they were sort of squarish at the sides of the C-curve... you had the nice curve then as you got to either side they suddenly go down at a right angle.

Have you tried tailoring your form to fit? You do this by taking out the middle before removing it from the backing, and then fit it to the nails and scissor it out until you get a good fit?
Sorry... I'm a bit dippy... would you beable to explain a bit more for me?:o
 

Little Angel

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hiya

right hope this is clearer

1) take your form and remove the middle part, stick it somewhere if you like to use it for support (ps i am refering to rectangle forms not horseshoe types)

2) remove the paper backing just in this exposed centre

3) now fit your form (ob it wont stick as you have the backing paper still on)
4) look at how it fits if eg she has deep side wall using curved scissors cut your form to match
5) once you are happy with the fit remove the backing and away you go.

HTH if you still dont understand i will e-mail you a diagram just pm me ok?
 

geeg

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As I read it you are actually saying that the C curve of the nail is not a true curve but rather the sides go off at (sort of ) right angles!! Many men have this shape of nail. A form is not going to fit this nail as a form only works in a true curve.

Why not use a tip? Eclipse Clear/or opaque Tips have just this sort of side wall and are made for this type of nail shape. Not everyone is a good candidate for sculpting. I tend to sculpt the easy ones and tip the difficult ones. Why make work?? and maybe not get such a beautiful result?
 

june

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I don'tknow if this is of any help, but Tammy Taylor do several forms for different types of nails. They have a black form which is designed to work on flat nails or nails with a very extreme curve. Maybe they would work on the problem nails. I find them really very good.
Hope this helps.
luv June.
 

liza smith

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geeg is right when she says that sometimes a tip is the best option, however the only option i can think of that hasn't been mentioned regarding forming a "square" c curve is to file away the corners of the free edge.
these corners are pressing down on the sides of the form & not allowing the c curve to fully fit underneath.
it is a popular misconception that u need a bit of free edge to fit the form under. this isn't always the best option, as some of the free edge will interfere with the placement of the form, as in this case.
follow the steps mentioned b4 for pretailouring the form as well as removing the corners, if all this doesn't work then fit a tip, probably an eclipse because of the square c curve.
good luck
liza xx
 

Mani-fique!

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Many men have this shape of nail.
Oh dear lol Not sure that will go down very well with my mum-in-law... although she'll laugh her socks off I'm sure!

Why not use a tip? Eclipse Clear/or opaque Tips have just this sort of side wall and are made for this type of nail shape. Not everyone is a good candidate for sculpting. I tend to sculpt the easy ones and tip the difficult ones. Why make work?? and maybe not get such a beautiful result?
The thought was crossing my mind but I thought that there would be a way to sculpt with this type of nail.... I was trying to get round the fact that I've not got any eclipse tips at the moment but you're right.... why make work for myself when I don't have to.

file away the corners of the free edge.
these corners are pressing down on the sides of the form & not allowing the c curve to fully fit underneath.
This sounds a good idea.... is this the sort of thing Sam is explains in his sculpting tutorial? :

If the free edge is long, I want to ensure there is no curling along the lower arch
(curling along the lower arch will push down on my form and lead to seepage underneath the nail).
If the natural nail is short… I will actually file the shape of the smile line into the free edge.
Thanks for the help.... its been very... well..... helpful! lol:biggrin:
 
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