A lesson to be learnt

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Snugglepuss

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I found this earlier today and It's not intended to be a scaremongering thread.

However, we can learn a couple of things -

Firstly the Client Consultation Card is a must - I for one wouldn't wax somebody with type 1 diabetes .

Secondly, We should always wear gloves - for our own safety and also clients safety.

I feel a little bit sad that the article says Nail Salons have been known to spread infection - but at least we all on here know what we should do!

Woman Almost Dies After Bikini Wax
Wednesday, July 11, 2007
By Katherine Tweed

E-MAIL STORY
PRINTER FRIENDLY VERSION
'Brazilian' bikini waxes are increasingly popular among women who live nowhere near the bikini-clad beaches of Rio de Janeiro. For one 20-year-old woman in Melbourne, Australia, this routine procedure nearly took her life.

The woman was admitted to an emergency room just two weeks after receiving a the Brazilian bikini wax, a procedure that involves removing even more hair front-to-back than a traditional bikini wax, according to the Brief Report published online in the June issue of the journal of Clinical Infectious Diseases.

"Our case is notable, because it illustrates the infectious risks of in a patient with diabetes," the authors concluded. "The beauty industry is growing at an unprecedented rate and more invasive and potentially harmful procedures are increasingly available."

The authors of the report warn that anyone with a compromised immune system, including diabetics and people infected with HIV, should think twice about waxing, or any procedure.

While the patient experienced "significant pain" and some bleeding during the procedure, which was performed by a trainee beauty therapist, her health had taken a sharp turn for the worse by the time she sought medical attention.

According to the report, the young woman had poorly controlled diabetes. She was admitted to the hospital with a high fever, excruciating pain, "grossly swollen" genitalia, and a rash across her chest and neck.

The woman's pain was so intense and the inflammation so severe that doctors were barely able to examine her in the emergency room.

Eventually, the doctors were able to take blood samples and cultures, which came back positive for the potentially life-threatening bacteria, Streptococcus pyogenes.

The patient's weakened immune put her at risk when she underwent the hot-wax procedure, which caused the infection. A more complete exam, done under general anesthetic, revealed the woman was infected with herpes simplex.

She was discharged after 10 days in the hospital after a steady regimen of antibiotics and other medications that saved her life. While she had regained her health, she had not learned her lesson.

Six months later, the woman again tried to remove her pubic hair, but this time she was shaving herself. She subsequently developed a recurrence of Herpes and another skin infection.

She was treated again successfully, but the report noted that, "despite her traumatic experiences, the patient was keen to undertake further removal of pubic hair."

Even for salon customers without suppressed immune systems, this woman's story can be a lesson. Many studies have shown nail salons that do not properly sterilize equipment can easily spread hepatitis.

Every salon patron, especially those getting bikini waxes, should ensure that they attend clean and reputable establishments where therapists regularly wash their hands and wear gloves
The authors of this report also recommend physicians familiarize themselves with these beauty practices so they can better advise patients about the pros and cons of their beauty regimens.
 

oey

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You are dead right Debs about Diabetes type 1.

But, it is amazing as to how many clients who are diabetic dont undertstand the risks involved in being waxed and get quite upset when you ask for doctors approval.
 

Snugglepuss

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I do feel for women with type 1 - I had a friend (she's since died) who had type one and she couldn't use an epilator or anything!

She never wore makeup and just in general had to be really careful with beauty products - such as scrubs and immac!
 

Gill

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I do feel for women with type 1 - I had a friend (she's since died) who had type one and she couldn't use an epilator or anything!

She never wore makeup and just in general had to be really careful with beauty products - such as scrubs and immac!
I'm sorry, I know this will offend at least some - but those WITH type 1 diabetes will thank me, I'm sure. But this post is absolute and utter scaremongering poppycock! Care is indeed required in POORLY CONTROLLED DIABETES TYPE ONE OR TWO! but to say that we can't wear make-up or be wary of beauty products is an uneducated, appaling statement to make. I am sorry your friend died, but I doubt it was throught the use of waxing, facials or any other beauty treatment!
 

oey

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I'm sorry, I know this will offend at least some - but those WITH type 1 diabetes will thank me, I'm sure. But this post is absolute and utter scaremongering poppycock! Care is indeed required in POORLY CONTROLLED DIABETES TYPE ONE OR TWO! but to say that we can't wear make-up or be wary of beauty products is an uneducated, appaling statement to make. I am sorry your friend died, but I doubt it was throught the use of waxing, facials or any other beauty treatment!

Gill - I appreciate what you are saying, but I do think you need to add something constructive to your reply. What advice can you give us then on how to deal with clients that are diabetic.

Dont forgt we are taught at college to be very careful when dealing with diabetics, so I dont think (in my opinion) this thread is scare mongering at all!
 

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Snugglepuss

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I'm sorry, I know this will offend at least some - but those WITH type 1 diabetes will thank me, I'm sure. But this post is absolute and utter scaremongering poppycock! Care is indeed required in POORLY CONTROLLED DIABETES TYPE ONE OR TWO! but to say that we can't wear make-up or be wary of beauty products is an uneducated, appaling statement to make. I am sorry your friend died, but I doubt it was throught the use of waxing, facials or any other beauty treatment!
Well I am offended - bigstyle! and Gill it isn't an uneducated statement - it is experience and education that I based my reply on! you haven't added anything constructive to the post - if you had then I would have been willing to say that perhaps I had got things wrong!

My friend didn't die of something connected with waxing, facials or any other beauty - she died of an infection whilst under going treatment for cancer! - why? because immune systems are even lower than ever when receiving treatment and doubly so because of the diabetes!

If you are wised up to diabetes will you know that you have to be careful with lots of things including your eyes - therefore, if you have an infectious bacteria or dirt on your mascara brush - then infection will definitely follow! Tell me then, that you shouldn't be careful with makeup????

As I said in the original post it was more about making people aware OF WHAT COULD HAPPEN and why it was important for the client consultation cards!

Do you know geeks I am fed up about having to word everything so carefully - Gill you picked on the bit about the epilator - are you telling me that you would advise a person with type one to use an epilator??

My friend chose not to wear make up because of the risk of infection in her eyes - I didn't say people with type one couldn't wear make up!!!!

Scrubs contains salts etc and if not used properly can scratch even people with out type one - Gill are you telling me therefore you would give a client a really good manicure or pedicure scrub with type one diabetes????

Gill can Immac not burn sensitive skin? or even normal skin? so are you telling me that you would advise a diabetic client to use immac for hair removal - I don't think so !

As for type one diabetics thanking you for your post maybe they will be BUT I know that my clients would thank me for being cautious and thinking of their health rather than wading in with out a little bit of knowledge!

I am sorry for my angry outburst but sometimes, even I get fed up of trying to please all of the people all of the time :irked:

Mods feel free to delete this thread if you deem it necessary!
 

Sassy Hassy

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Mods feel free to delete this thread if you deem it necessary!


Diabetes is always one of those contra's that comes up in so many treatments so I feel that this is such a valid thread and I think that as long as everyone stays calm then no need to delete. Obviously a raw nerve was hit somewhere along the line, but it is so much better to approach a counter argument with an informed approach. So please let's keep the information flowing and keep emotions under control :hug:

Whenever in doubt, and if you feel out of your depth then best advice is always refuse treatment - let a more experienced person take control.
 

Gill

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Read my words Snugglepuss - when you read all of them, you may realise that i am not basing my outburst on education and others experiences, but my own. I HAVE type 1 diabetes.
Yes, I use scrubs - not sugar based ones. Yes, I wax - with exactly the same care as I wax a person without diabetes. Yes, I use mascara, I change it every 3 months, and so should anyone else. It's all common sense, and if - for example - someone has thinning skin, this is very obvious (or should be at very least to the trained eye!) and should not be waxed - wether that person has diabetes or not (age is another 'condition' that causes thinning of the skin) That covered, lets take the argument of 'hot' wax on a person with diabetes - does that not then suggest that 'hot' wax is okay on a person without diabetes?! Of course not. One day I may become more sensitive to heat, but you know what? If I do my job properly, and if the therapist who waxes me when I don't want to do my own does her job properly, then I won't have any issues with being waxed. And nor should anyone else.
And you know, if you're going to insist on being so pedantic, let me tell you this. You should refer to your friends/ clients as a person with diabetes, NOT a diabetic - we are afterall, people - NOT a condition.
 

Snugglepuss

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Read my words Snugglepuss - when you read all of them, you may realise that i am not basing my outburst on education and others experiences, but my own. I HAVE type 1 diabetes.

I realised you had type 1 diabetes - I haven't and therefore I am more cautious about treating Diabetics - I also think it is different when you use products on yourself - you are aware of the limitations or what can be done through experiencing it yourself - I have only education and experience of a friend (now deceased as stated) who advised me what she did and what was in her honest opinion was the best way to treat a diabetic - a person with type one diabetes!
Yes, I use scrubs - not sugar based ones. Yes, I wax - with exactly the same care as I wax a person without diabetes. Yes, I use mascara, I change it every 3 months, and so should anyone else.

So they should but do they honestly. One of the first things a client said to me was "wow you keep your own files and things for each customer? my previous nail tech used the same ones for everyone!" now I know that files can be sanitised and shouldn't pose a problem if carried out properly - but what happens if it isn't?

It's all common sense,

I agree 100% with that statement!

and if - for example - someone has thinning skin, this is very obvious (or should be at very least to the trained eye!) and should not be waxed - wether that person has diabetes or not (age is another 'condition' that causes thinning of the skin) That covered, lets take the argument of 'hot' wax on a person with diabetes - does that not then suggest that 'hot' wax is okay on a person without diabetes?! Of course not.

I agree again BUT you have to be aware of the consequences of your actions - if you do cause trauma to the skin, then you have to be aware that problems may occur afterwards! Furthermore, we can not always guarantee how well a person controls their diabetes, so again as someone who has not got type one or two diabetes then I will err on the side of caution - IMHO it is better that way than steaming in and getting it wrong!

One day I may become more sensitive to heat, but you know what? If I do my job properly, and if the therapist who waxes me when I don't want to do my own does her job properly, then I won't have any issues with being waxed. And nor should anyone else.

That's fine as well - you take the responsibility, as will do the therapist who waxes you - I am saying I will use caution and ensure that if I do carry out a treatment on somebody who is Diabetic - or anybody for that matter, then it is carried out with the best interests of that person. If I believe that it would to be their detriment then I would not carry it out!

And you know, if you're going to insist on being so pedantic, let me tell you this. You should refer to your friends/ clients as a person with diabetes, NOT a diabetic - we are afterall, people - NOT a condition.

Now I actually believe it is you that is being pedantic - yes you are people and human and have feelings, but that does not give you the right to be rude and it also does not give you the right to expect me or anyone else to think exactly like you!
Gill IMHO you have made this thread into a disaster, it was meant to be about awareness not how I view things - it was about looking at what happened to someone who didn't use caution. If recomending that caution and being made aware of "unhappy endings" is a bad thing, then so be it!

However Gill, I am not going to flog a dead horse here, you want to be agressive towards me and have the last word then I will not be so pedantic as to try and have the last word myself but I will simply put you on my ignore list!
 

chantell simone

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i always carry out a thorough consultation with every treatment i do

if i am ever in doubt i refuse to do the treatment

its all about being vigilant
 

Snugglepuss

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i always carry out a thorough consultation with every treatment i do

if i am ever in doubt i refuse to do the treatment

its all about being vigilant
Exctly the point I was trying to make :hug:
 

rouge

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Whatever treatment we're doing, we should work within our comfort zone. If I'm not happy with the thought of doing a particular treatment on a particular person, or type of person, I won't do it. My standards may very well be different to other therapists, but it doesn't necessarily make any of us wrong, it just makes us different.

Diabetes is not necessarily a contra-indication, but a caution. If the diabetes is well-managed then I personally don't have a problem with waxing a diabetic. I'm a lot more cautious than with a non-diabetic and if I see the skin reacting badly then I stop. But that doesn't make me right and you wrong. If you are more cautious than I am then fair enough, that's your decision and no-one should slate you for that.

I for one appreciate you bringing this to our attention (again! :lol:)
 

1999judy

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Read my words Snugglepuss - when you read all of them, you may realise that i am not basing my outburst on education and others experiences, but my own. I HAVE type 1 diabetes.
Yes, I use scrubs - not sugar based ones. Yes, I wax - with exactly the same care as I wax a person without diabetes. Yes, I use mascara, I change it every 3 months, and so should anyone else. It's all common sense, and if - for example - someone has thinning skin, this is very obvious (or should be at very least to the trained eye!) and should not be waxed - wether that person has diabetes or not (age is another 'condition' that causes thinning of the skin) That covered, lets take the argument of 'hot' wax on a person with diabetes - does that not then suggest that 'hot' wax is okay on a person without diabetes?! Of course not. One day I may become more sensitive to heat, but you know what? If I do my job properly, and if the therapist who waxes me when I don't want to do my own does her job properly, then I won't have any issues with being waxed. And nor should anyone else.
And you know, if you're going to insist on being so pedantic, let me tell you this. You should refer to your friends/ clients as a person with diabetes, NOT a diabetic - we are afterall, people - NOT a condition.


Thats strange... my friend has diabetes and she always refers to herself as a diabetic.
I never knew this was an issue until now:eek:
 

tinkywinky

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Gosh that is scarey. Puts me off bikini waxing. Not going to train for Brazilian. The poor woman.
 

Sassy Hassy

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Gosh that is scarey. Puts me off bikini waxing. Not going to train for Brazilian. The poor woman.
It shouldn't put you off, just make you more aware and more careful that's all, and I am sure that that's what Snuggs intention is.
 

tinkywinky

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Yeah true no it doesn't put me off actually, makes you more vigilant. Just booked a bikini wax.x
 

becca boo

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I understand what everyone is saying here. This is my question, at what point does it become the clients responsibility? We do as much as we can to protect ALL of our clients give them after care instructions doesnt mean they follow it. Whos to say that tech did everything right but the client didnt take care of her self properly didnt keep clean whatever its a warm can be sweaty area. Hello, yeast infections are common for females. She didnt care enough what happened the first time that she shaved her self got a break out of herpes and another infection there was no tech involved and she says she will continue to remove her pubic hair and deal with her consequences.
 

oey

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I understand what everyone is saying here. This is my question, at what point does it become the clients responsibility? We do as much as we can to protect ALL of our clients give them after care instructions doesnt mean they follow it. Whos to say that tech did everything right but the client didnt take care of her self properly didnt keep clean whatever its a warm can be sweaty area. Hello, yeast infections are common for females. She didnt care enough what happened the first time that she shaved her self got a break out of herpes and another infection there was no tech involved and she says she will continue to remove her pubic hair and deal with her consequences.
Good point Becca boo - but clients always tend to trace the problem back to the treatment they have had, as use that as a trigger for the problem. It human nature I suppose to blame somebody else. But then I suppose it is down to use to pass that responsibility to the client.
 

gemmamarie

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i always carry out a thorough consultation with every treatment i do

if i am ever in doubt i refuse to do the treatment

its all about being vigilant
This is exactly right! If I am ever in doubt i also refuse treatment and tell the client to consult their doctor first :hug:
 

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