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Advice on broken enhancement and nail underneath

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Carole Lindsay

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I've just had a friend on the phone in a panic! She fell over and has broken her L&P enhancement and the nail underneath right past what she called the "quick" (i'm assuming she means the hyponychium) and it is weeping a bit. She wanted to know should she try to get it off or just tape it up and leave it for me to deal with on Friday when i do her infills. My advice was tape it and leave alone for the time being.

Did i give the right advice? What is the best course of action when i come to deal with it on Friday?
 

geeg

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I feel you should have asked her to come in right away so you can immobilize the break, sanitize it and repair it.

Every time it moves it will be ainful for her, not to mention she now has a window open for infection to possibly set in.

How to deal with the breakage:

First sanitize hands thoroughly. Then, open the wound slightly and sanitize it. this will sting but only momentarily. Then open the wound slightly again and using a pharmaceutical grade EC resin, apply to the wound and close it up applying gentle pressure until dry. The pain will be relieved imediately.

Then very gently, thin the area over the breakage while supporting the nail all the time, and sanitize and re-apply l/P over the area to reinforce the break.

If the client experiences any paiful throbing durring the next 24 hours, the enhancement will have to be removed BUT ... I have never had this occur to a client whose nail I have mended EVER. By the next rebalance, you can either soak off an reapy or leave it alone to grow out naturally.
 

Jeni Giles

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I would have her come in as soon as possible, so that you may clean and apply antiseptic to the nail, and then stabilize or mend as needed, it WILL sting and throb for about 24-48 hours, but she should be able to resume normal activity with her hands once you have mended the break. If you leave it open, she runs the risk of infection and damage to her nail bed. Just like Gigi said, you can soak of or leave it alone after mending and check on it with each rebalance.
 

geeg

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Jeni Giles said:
I would have her come in as soon as possible, so that you may clean and apply antiseptic to the nail, and then stabilize or mend as needed, it WILL sting and throb for about 24-48 hours, but she should be able to resume normal activity with her hands once you have mended the break. If you leave it open, she runs the risk of infection and damage to her nail bed. Just like Gigi said, you can soak of or leave it alone after mending and check on it with each rebalance.
Once the nail is made stable, it should NOT be stinging or throbbing at all, never mind for 24-48 hours. If there is any throbbing after a 12 hour period, then the enhancement must come off. Throbbing means infection.
 

talented talons

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Hi carole, let me know how it goes, sounds painful for the client. We all know how it hurts when you break a nail especially when its above the Hyponychium. OUCH.
 

Fab Freak

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talented talons said:
Hi carole, let me know how it goes, sounds painful for the client. We all know how it hurts when you break a nail especially when its above the Hyponychium. OUCH.
Dont ya mean below??? would it not be the free edge if it was above the Hyponychium - our louvly nail protector :o
 

geeg

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Guess it depends which way you are looking doesn't it??

That is why we use zone 1,2,3 terminology ... so much easier.
 

Carole Lindsay

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Ok everyone i've made a big mistake by telling her to leave it alone - i thought it best but obviously got it wrong :o .

I'll send her an email to see how it is doing today. Is it too late to do anything about it now? Should i now wait until Friday when i'm doing her nails?
 

Carole Lindsay

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Geeg, what is EC resin??
 

TracyUK

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best to check her nail as soon as poss as everytime she catches the broken enhancement it may cause more damage to the natural nail and like others have said it needs protecting from infection
 

Carole Lindsay

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Just been emailing with the client who is at work during the day. She's told me that the break is half way down the nail. The L&P is still in place but she's sure the break is thru the nail as well as the L&P. However there is no exposed area that i could apply resin to. I'm going to have a look at it to see what i can do this evening but in the meantime she's going to show it to the nurse at work to see what she thinks.

Will keep you posted on the outcome.
 

Dawnie

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Carole Lindsay said:
Geeg, what is EC resin??
Hi Carole

Its means the the Resin is EC approved (European Community)

Cheers Dawn
 

Carole Lindsay

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Dawnie said:
Hi Carole

Its means the the Resin is EC approved (European Community)

Cheers Dawn
Thanx for that Dawn but how would i know? Presumably all my Star Nails resin are EC approved arent they??
 

geeg

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Carole Lindsay said:
Geeg, what is EC resin??
EC stands for Ethyl Cynoacrylate which is resin that is much more highly refined for use on porous surfaces. Pharmaceutical quality means that the resin is even more highly refined for use on the human body. All Creative adhesives and Fabric# resins are pharmaceutical grade EC Resins.

As opposed to

MC adhesives (which stands for Methyl Cynoacrylate) are adhesives which are industrial grade, more unrefined, like super glue, lock tite etc which are unsuitable for use on porous surfaces, such as the the human body. They are porous, attract moisture and are carcinogenic. Those who use Super Glue and the like will do serious damage to their nails as well as the fact that Super glue doesn't work for long as it breaks down in water quite easily and attracts moisture under the 'stick on' which is why so many women have horrendous black and green nails after wearing 'stick ons' for a long period of time.

You see ... you get what you pay for even though you do not always know the reason why!! The more refined an EC adhsive is, the more expensive it is !!


There are many different grades of resin (hundreds) actually. High end and low end and all the others in between as always. The higher the quality, the longer the enhancements last! These systems are not all the same despite what many people think ... most just don't understand the chemistry or the difference in quality because you can't SEE it. But you can experience the difference.
 

TracyUK

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Geeg do all resins supplied for nails break down in water eventually? I was under the impression they did...hence just one of the many reasons for taking out much of the contact area in a tip.
 

Carole Lindsay

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geeg said:


EC stands for Ethyl Cynoacrylate which is resin that is much more highly refined for use on porous surfaces. Pharmaceutical quality means that the resin is even more highly refined for use on the human body. All Creative adhesives and Fabric# resins are pharmaceutical grade EC Resins.

As opposed to

MC adhesives (which stands for Methyl Cynoacrylate) are adhesives which are industrial grade, more unrefined, like super glue, lock tite etc which are unsuitable for use on porous surfaces, such as the the human body. They are porous, attract moisture and are carcinogenic. Those who use Super Glue and the like will do serious damage to their nails as well as the fact that Super glue doesn't work for long as it breaks down in water quite easily and attracts moisture under the 'stick on' which is why so many women have horrendous black and green nails after wearing 'stick ons' for a long period of time.

You see ... you get what you pay for even though you do not always know the reason why!! The more refined an EC adhsive is, the more expensive it is !!


There are many different grades of resin (hundreds) actually. High end and low end and all the others in between as always. The higher the quality, the longer the enhancements last! These systems are not all the same despite what many people think ... most just don't understand the chemistry or the difference in quality because you can't SEE it. But you can experience the difference.
I've just checked all my resins and thank goodness they are all EC ones NOT MC!!

By the way, the client went to see the nurse at work who recommended cutting the nail back to the edge of the finger so that it doesnt catch and letting the enhancement grow off naturally. She's also given her dressings to put over the nail and she's popping here on her way home from work to have the nail cut back. Presumably to try to remove the enhancement would be very painful because of the chemicals seeping into where the crack is underneath?
 

geeg

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TracyUK said:
Geeg do all resins supplied for nails break down in water eventually? I was under the impression they did...hence just one of the many reasons for taking out much of the contact area in a tip.
Yes they do, especially the systems that use only one grade of EC resin.

One of the reasons why the Fabric# system never seems to break down or discolour or age is because of the resin BOOST. Boost is a resin with very low porosity and it takes much longer to actually break down than thinner resins ... longer than it would be on a nail between rebalances, so the enhancements stay looking fantastic time after time after time. That is why 3 different resins are used in the Fabric# system ... so that each resin does its specific job the best .. not just one resin trying to do every job well. That's why clients love it, why it is so strong and why they love YOU, the technician, for using it.

I am not disrespecting anyone elses choice to use whatever product they want, just explaining why Fabric# is different and why one gets such superior results when using it.
 

geeg

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Carole Lindsay said:
I've just checked all my resins and thank goodness they are all EC ones NOT MC!!

By the way, the client went to see the nurse at work who recommended cutting the nail back to the edge of the finger so that it doesnt catch and letting the enhancement grow off naturally. She's also given her dressings to put over the nail and she's popping here on her way home from work to have the nail cut back. Presumably to try to remove the enhancement would be very painful because of the chemicals seeping into where the crack is underneath?
I would be very surprised if any professional nail company was selling MC resin. But they do sometime sell it with stick ons.

Just remember (everyone, not specifically Carole) that EC resin does not mean it's of pharmaceutical quality or even a high quality grade of resin ... for reassurance on that one you will have to go by your results and your faith in your supplier and their integrity.
 

Dawnie

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Hi Carole

Sorry love looks like I got the wrong end of the stick serve me right for not reading post right glad Geeg has put you right

Take care Dawnie x
 

Cathie!

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EZ Flow resin is pharmaseutical grade - sure I've spelled that wrong.

I use it whenever one of my kids has a nasty cut (not often...lol) after all that's what they use in A&E these days when stitches aren't always necessary (my son's ear lobe can confirm this). Mydaughter had bowel surgery the day after she was born (32 weeks, 4lb...bless) and they closed the wound with pharmeceutical resin. Much more pleasing to the eye than stitches!!
 
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