French manicure polish

Hi all,
I have a lady I have just done a set of gel nails for (trial run for her wedding) and she couldnt handle the tips she is a childminder etc and has 3 dogs so she does have a busy lifestyle...anyway..she wants them removed but I have suggested a nice french polish on her own nails instead for her wedding as her nails are quite decent anyway-maybe just a bit more length. What I wanted to ask is what is your fave method for french polishing? Would you paint straight on in a vertical way? Or sweep from side to side & clean up the line with nailfresh (or similar)? Not that it makes much difference really but Im just gauging what others do for the best result.
Thanks
Toni xxx
 

roseblanc

Member
My french manicures with polish aren't so great (still working on getting my hand steady) so what I do is paint with vertical swipes and then to make the perfect smile line I use a very small art brush with some acetone free nail polish remover on it and wipe away any excess mess I made to create my smile line. For me, it works like a charm and it doesn't waste much time at all.
 

deanosnana

Super Moderator
Staff member
The easiest way for me is to start at one corner and sweep down and around to the other corner to make a nice smile. I have really good luck this way. Also, I use Essie's Marshmallow (thanks Weezie) for my white tip. It's the BEST white polish I've ever used.

Good luck! :)
 

Martin Duffy

Well-Known Member
I apply it in a single sweep from side to side as I find this the easiest to get a good smile line. Regarding the use of brush & acetone - I can understand that it removes the excess white & thus tidies up the line, but does it not also remove some of the base-coat as well?!
 

roseblanc

Member
Regarding the use of brush & acetone - I can understand that it removes the excess white & thus tidies up the line, but does it not also remove some of the base-coat as well?!
I touch with a very very light touch to only remove the excess white. It is possible that I may be removing a tiny bit of the base coat - but it doesn't look like it. :):)
 

Jabez

New Member
Hi there, I find that the acetone or non-acetone seems to effect the quality of the brush that i am using to tidy up the back of the smile line. I use either an old acrylic brush i no longer use for l&p or an old gel brush (also no longer used for gel), I'n going to start using nailfresh soon as I think this will be friendlier on my brushes. I paint vertically and find this works for me, I use a make called Brucci nail polish - their opaque white is a dream to work.
 

bellabeautie

Member
Hi, I just do one sweep from side to side....the more you practice the better you will get! Then I just use a correction pen or orange stick in cotton wool to tidy up any bits I may have got on the skin. Is that Essie Marshmallow any good then? Ive got the white from OPI but as the brush is so wide its hard to do so Ive just been using the sally henson one. Was looking to get a new one xx
 

deanosnana

Super Moderator
Staff member
Is that Essie Marshmallow any good then? Ive got the white from OPI but as the brush is so wide its hard to do so Ive just been using the sally henson one. Was looking to get a new one xx
Essie's Marshmallow is the BEST white I've ever used for a french and I've used many. Try it, I think you'll love it. The brush is perfect, not too big, not too small.

Good luck! :)
 

bexi

Active Member
I apply it in a single sweep from side to side as I find this the easiest to get a good smile line. Regarding the use of brush & acetone - I can understand that it removes the excess white & thus tidies up the line, but does it not also remove some of the base-coat as well?!
I personally don't do this, but I have heard of therapists who apply white then pop base coat over this.

B x
 

weezie

Well-Known Member
I personally don't do this, but I have heard of therapists who apply white then pop base coat over this.

B x
Yes, if you're a bit unsure then doing one thin coat of white then base coat then the bolder layer of white over does mean you can fix mistakes in the first layer without removing the base coat. Then you still get the benefit of the base covering most of the nail and you can follow the original white line for the second layer of white.
 

Lots of good ideas here guys thank u all v much :) x
 

Martin Duffy

Well-Known Member
I personally don't do this, but I have heard of therapists who apply white then pop base coat over this.

B x
Thanks for that! As I am a free-hander I was wondering how it would be done without removing the base coat!
 

bexi

Active Member
Thanks for that! As I am a free-hander I was wondering how it would be done without removing the base coat!
Its supposed to stop the white chipping so quickly as well!:green:
 

sknight

Well-Known Member
Hi, I just do one sweep from side to side....the more you practice the better you will get! Then I just use a correction pen or orange stick in cotton wool to tidy up any bits I may have got on the skin. Is that Essie Marshmallow any good then? Ive got the white from OPI but as the brush is so wide its hard to do so Ive just been using the sally henson one. Was looking to get a new one xx
I agree it's a matter of practice and playing to find a technique which is comfortable to you.

I personally apply the white in one sweep from side to side, after a bit of practice you wont need to tidy the smile line at all, I find it easier to hold the finger with your thumb and index finger then gently roll the clients finger keeping your brush still, this gives me a nice crisp smile.
 

deanosnana

Super Moderator
Staff member
I personally apply the white in one sweep from side to side, after a bit of practice you wont need to tidy the smile line at all, I find it easier to hold the finger with your thumb and index finger then gently roll the clients finger keeping your brush still, this gives me a nice crisp smile.
Agree...the rolling of the finger is the key to a crisp smile line! :)
 

Violet Star

Well-Known Member
Couldnt you do a NNO for the client if she cant handle the tips?
As there would be no risk of chipping from harsh movements
 
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