Beauty Therapy Training! What Do You Think?

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#21
Ok guys , lets just step back for a mo. Were all here to help each other out and to offer our advice. Every one is entitled to their oppinions and no one is slatering them , i think we all have our oppinions on short and long courses. I have made my say and others are entitled to.

REMEMBER GUYS LETS STICK TOGETHER AND HELP EACH OTHER OUT ! BEFORE IT STARTS INTO A SLANGING MATCH
XX
 

Mrs.Clooney

Positive Geek
#22
Ok guys , lets just step back for a mo. Were all here to help each other out and to offer our advice. Every one is entitled to their oppinions and no one is slatering them , i think we all have our oppinions on short and long courses. I have made my say and others are entitled to.

REMEMBER GUYS LETS STICK TOGETHER AND HELP EACH OTHER OUT ! BEFORE IT STARTS INTO A SLANGING MATCH
XX
Thank you Nail Spa. Constuctive and helpful! Moving on.........
 
#23
Yes, I realize this, but with the short course, one can take it at their own pace and practice in between. Then one STILL has to sit an exam. If you know your stuff, you pass. If you don't know your stuff, then you don't pass!

Let me try to explain it like this. My hubby did an MBA through the Open University. As he is the bread winner in our family, it was not possible for him to do it full time. He had to do all the modules plus took a six month break for the birth of our second daughter. He also had to attend weekend classes and complete assignments which were marked by his tutor. Then he sat for an exam before passing his degree with flying colours. No mean feat and bloody hard work and I know, because myself and our 2 girls know only too well how hard he worked. His degree is very recognized and respected and no less thought of because he studied at home or didn't attend uni full time. When he sat the exam, he either knew his stuff or he didn't! Simple as that!
You were talking about a 6 day course,nothing was said anout keep going back or over time.He didnt do his MBA over 6 days so no compareson.Dont ask for opinions if you dont like the answer.I wasn't being rude,you jump down my throat casue of a reply I gave someone else.

I am straight to the point,wasnt trying to be nasty to you buit being straight.You know what,dont ask advice if you cant take peoples opinions.
 

Mrs.Clooney

Positive Geek
#24
You were talking about a 6 day course,nothing was said anout keep going back or over time.He didnt do his MBA over 6 days so no compareson.Dont ask for opinions if you dont like the answer.I wasn't being rude,you jump down my throat casue of a reply I gave someone else.

I am straight to the point,wasnt trying to be nasty to you buit being straight.You know what,dont ask advice if you cant take peoples opinions.
If you read my posts, you would see that the course can be done at ONES OWN PACE just as my hubby did his MBA.

Your original post was referring to us as DIYers. Not polite and not what I consider CONSTRUCTIVE!
 

Sassy Hassy

Well-Known Member
#25
It's such a shame that people cannot debate these days. if you want to speak your mind then fine, just expect people to speak it right back at you in the same straight to the point manner.

I really think that this topic is going to become one of those no-no's on here along with politics and religion as it always ends like this.

However just to throw into the melting pot a few other thoughts I have. If people come out of college after 2 or 3 years and are fully qualified with effectively the latest techniques and fully skilled then why are salons so loathe to employ them? Why do they insist on people already having salon experience?

Not meant to be controversial in any way, just an observation which tells me that salons think that actually a college course does not leave you equipped to work in the real world.
 

BABSann

Well-Known Member
#26
It's such a shame that people cannot debate these days. if you want to speak your mind then fine, just expect people to speak it right back at you on the same straight to the point manner.

I really think that this topic is going to become one of those no-no's on here along with politics and religion as it always ends like this.

However just to throw into the melting pot a few other thoughts I have. If people come out of college after 2 or 3 years and are fully qualified with effectively the latest techniques and fully skilled then why are salons so loathe to employ them? Why do they insist on people already having salon experience?

Not meant to be controversial in any way, just an observation which tells me that salons think that actually a college course does not leave you equipped to work in the real world.
I have to say that I got a job immediately after leaving college Sass,I found that I had no trouble at all and was offered several interviews when I called the salons,as soon as I qualified.

The main reason why people find it so hard to get a job in a salon, once they leave college, is that all the youngsters leave at the same time and all of them have the same qualifications.However what they do lack is people skills,maturity and empathy.(sorry not meaning to offend youngsters,but this is what I have been told)

The more mature ladies with the same qualifications are the ones the salons want.

This is unfortunate for the younger ones but I really dont agree with what you have said about salons not feeling college leavers are equipped to work in the real world.

Indeed,when you are at college you have to prove that you can work unaided and on the public.Workshops are held every week where the general public come into the college and have cheap treatments.This is why the NVQ is one of the most sought after qualifications and one that most salons require before even looking at you sideways.


I think it would be a shame to have this topic as a no,no after all we are grown adults.Just a shame some people dont act like it.
 

Sassy Hassy

Well-Known Member
#27
Thanks Babs for a sensible response. Whenever I have seen ads for a salon job it has always asked for experience which rightly or wrongly I assumed to mean that they don't want people straight out of college. I take your point about lack of maturity and maybe that is more the reason why.
 

BABSann

Well-Known Member
#28
Thanks Babs for a sensible response. Whenever I have seen ads for a salon job it has always asked for experience which rightly or wrongly I assumed to mean that they don't want people straight out of college. I take your point about lack of maturity and maybe that is more the reason why.
:hug: No problem Sass xx
 

Susie H

Well-Known Member
#29
Wow!!!!!
Ok my ten peneth worth:lol: I think from what I have read on here that it realy does depend on 2 things.
What your local collage is like
What you are like.
I know a woman who studied beauty therepy down in Luton and by heck she knows her stuff:) but when she showed me what was covered in her 2 (or was it 3?) years it was a lot more then what is covered here in Northampton.
Her teachers were all employed in salons and kept bang up to date with all the latest inovations.
Sadly I know, some collages are not so picky in who they hire to teach and as a result the students are not as motavated or well informed as in other parts of the country.
If you are a self starter then industry training is for you.
My personal experience and what I have read on here, is that industry training is state of the art, but by its nature it relies on you to do a lot on your own in order to acheive your highest potential.
I know that creatives training takes you to NVQ standard and that the educators will always take you as far as you want to go. But we did a lot of home study. and when you have family comitments its dam difficult not to get sucked into the family life when you should be studying.
But if I already had a nurseing back ground then I don't think I could sit in collage covering stuff I already knew, I would want to hand my C.v. to my trainer and have them tailor my training to suit me and not waste my time teaching me things I already knew. Good luck with it hun please let us know which way you jump and who with:hug:
 

Martigirl

Well-Known Member
#30
Good luck with whatever you decide there are pros and cons with both and only you can weigh them up for your personal circumstances.

I have recently retrained from being a Call Centre Manager with 20 years of sales experience to being a qualified HND Beauty Therapist.

My HNC and HND were a very worthwhile 2 years as was my VTCT in Holistic therapies which took 6 months. My VTCT Indian Head Massage which was and intensive 5 days and 3 further months of case studies and portfolio work. My threading course which was a day long also taught me to do the treatment(still on the fence on this one cos I am not very good)

I guess what I am waffling on for is to say that I feel qualified because I am really interested in everything I study wether it be for 2 years full time or 5 intensive days.

I believe what you put in you get back out.

hth's:hug:
 

weezie

Well-Known Member
#31
Thanks Babs for a sensible response. Whenever I have seen ads for a salon job it has always asked for experience which rightly or wrongly I assumed to mean that they don't want people straight out of college. I take your point about lack of maturity and maybe that is more the reason why.
Sassy, I think they sometimes say this if they own the salon but personally don't know anything about beauty therapy themselves! They may feel this guarantees the therapist is o.k as they have managed to hold down a job! I was once interviewed for a therapist position in a salon in a very well known and posh London Department Store by a hairdresser who talked about "microwaving" meaning "microcurrent"!!! Also they may ask for someone with experience in a certain product as they don't want to spend money on training.

I trained in a private London School for CIBTAC and CIDESCO and I must say I felt ripped off due to lack of education of my original teacher. The course was one year full time 9-5. The good thing about the course though was that it was very hands on, with a working salon where we worked for 3 mths of the course (unpaid!). In order to get one of my certificates I needed to complete 600 hrs of treatments on real clients in a salon after finishing my schooling. I didn't feel I was really competent until I had these 600hrs under my belt.
:)
 

weezie

Well-Known Member
#32
Just wanted to add, after you are qualified, whatever course you take it really helps to talk to other therapists. Especially more experienced ones, but also those you train with. You can share ideas and offer each other tips.

This site will deffinately help with that, but also experiencing treatments from other therapists can help, I have definately picked up facial and body massage tips this way as it is all about how it "feels" not just how it looks. If there is a geek near you they may be willing to take you under their wing. I learnt a lot from my former employer, especially about how to get your clients to be responsive to your advise. As you are not planing on working in a salon this will be especially important.

:)

There are so many different variations in treatments and you want to be the best you can, this is where you get job satisfaction x
 

Clairet

Well-Known Member
#33
I did my initial Beauty Therapy training in college over 2 years.

Recently I decided to do a few one day refresher courses at my local wholesaler.

The eyelash tinting course was fine. Everything that needed to be covered, was and I think everyone learned a lot.

The waxing course was not so comprehensive. There is such a lot to learn, I really did not think everything was covered comprehensively in a one day course.

I was lucky that I already had my initial training, so it was really only a top up for me, just generally updating my skills.

I think the courses that can be done in your own time are a whole different ball game again. I would imagine that you would have a fair amount of home study to do as well, and I'm sure that they would be satisfactory.

At the end of the day, you'd be better doing an intensive course with a good tutor, than a lengthy college course with a tutor who may not be up to standard.

Obviously your time and family committments also have a bearing when you choose your training program, and this has to be taken into consideration. Not everyone would be able to commit to a two year college course.

Good luck with whatever you decide hun. You've had a lot of good advice on this thread.

HTH's:green:
 

#34
ok in reply to this
this is what i am learning for my itec beauty specialist degree can you learn all this in 6 days?
facial therapy
skin function
massage
exfoliation
skin analasis
the muscular system
eye treatments
skeletal system
histilogy
skin diseases and disordes
galvanisim
vacuum suction
micro current
faradism
pre heat treatments
blood circulatory
masks
lymphatic system
endocrine system
manicure
pedicure
first aid
neurological system
make up
waxing
bleaching

all this and a 3 day exam 5 case studies of each

can this really be learned in 6 days
 

smiler13334

#Nailartistic_me
#35
Being classed as a mature student, I was offered the part time beauty therapy course NVQ2 due to knowing all about cv's and how to deal with people up to a point...Unfortunately places where filled up and I am now on the waiting list...

The intensive courses I think would be good if a person is able to take in the amount of knowledge they give in one sitting plus there is alot of home work to be done.... great if they suit the person. I wanted to go for a college course due to...
1. Hearing good things about the college and reading up on pass marks and
Tutors
2. I can take in more knowledge at a pace that I know I can keep it, plus im one of those people it may take a couple of times before it sinks in, but once it's there it stays there....
3. I found it a little difficult at times to do all the working from home etc with my nails. I like the idea of having a quiet place to work and have all the references needed etc. And the public coming in to work on also will be great fun.

So while I am waiting for my placement, I am thinking of enrolling for an Anatomy and Physiology course as all beauty treatments need this info. Plus it will make the actual courses a little easier to understand Im sure... I have been told the endocrine system is a bit of a sod to learn lol.....

Good luck with your choice, you know your own ability and you will do excellent. Let us know how you do...I so no how you feel I was where you are a little while ago:)

Take care of you
xx
 

Mrs.Clooney

Positive Geek
#36
Thank you for your replies and input. Much appreciated. The input has helped me to sort things out in my head re what I think I plan to do. So thanks again geeks.
 

bombini

Well-Known Member
#37
I did Beauty Therapy Nvq 2 & 3 at college full time and loved it, i made some fantastic friends and also got a job in a spa whilst i was still training and i learnt so much from the other therapists, I would definetly reccomend getting some salon experience before working for yourself.

Personally i don't like short courses as i take ages to absorb all the theory that is covered and i know that i couldn't cope with a short course as i would be panicking about remembering all the info. If you think that you could handle it then go for it but before you do why not ask your local college if you could sit in on one of the classes and see just how much info there is to take in then you can decide which is for you :)
 

Mrs.Clooney

Positive Geek
#38
If you think that you could handle it then go for it but before you do why not ask your local college if you could sit in on one of the classes and see just how much info there is to take in then you can decide which is for you :)
This is a good idea. Thank you! I think I have pretty much made up my mind about what I am going to do but will look into your suggestion.

The course I am thinking of doing allows one the theory and practical modules in the class room followed by studying at home at ones own pace. You can then move on to the next module as and when you feel ready, provided the course and NVQ assessment are completed in 3 years.

College is not an option for me now and as has already been posted, I don't consider it a 'cop out' or 'DIY' issue!

I have taken on board the constructive postings. Thank you.
 

florence2004

Well-Known Member
#39
I think it is also down to the kind of person you are and whether you can recognise if you need more help and practice than others.

I have completed my 5 day CND foundation training but i know I am not ready to be working as a qualified nail tech yet. I am fully aware that my nails are not up to standard yet and that I need loads more practice.

Our industry is one of a practical nature and as with all practical careers you get better every time you do something. My husband is a carpenter and he did a 5 year apprenticeship when he left school 16 years ago. He is probably at the peak of his career now earning fairly decent money but it has taken a long time to get there and he was nowhere near as good when he left college as he is now.

i don't think it matters whether you do a short course or a long one at college as these are the foundations of your career showing you the basics (as long as the education you receive was of a good standard). To become a great nail tech/beautican it takes time and dedication on the therapists part and you will strive to become good if you are willing to put in the commitment to continue your learning beyond the classroom with things like this site, practice practice practice, research ect.
 
#40
I know there have been many replies to this thread, and by now you've probably drawn your own conclusion as to what route you will take. However, I did just want to give you my honest opinion.

I am currently studying VTCT level 2 Beauty one full day per week (as I too have family commitments), the course is run VERY much as though we were working in a salon, and in time we'll be let loose on paying customers (under the watchful eye of our tutor). I value my time at college and know I need to put in as much effort as possible. I am also studying VTCT fashion and photographic make-up at another local college. The difference in the 2 college's has enabled me to get the whole picture, and hopefully this will stand me in good stead once I start working.

I personally feel that to get the best possible beauty training you should do either full-time or part-time recognised courses at a college, then should you choose, do specific product lead training by way of intensive or one-day courses - this is what I too plan to do.

BTW, for nails I have decided not to study at college, I cover mani/pedi in the course, and feel that training with Creative (not long until foundation :green: ) will be better. I didn't feel that the VTCT nail tech course offered anything I couldn't find with Creative - hope i'm right :wink2: .

HTHs Dani
 
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