Waxing a diabetic - do you?

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Lil Linz

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right, first off, im not a beauty therapist, but my grandma asked me about this so i thought id ask the experts :lol:

My grandma is diabetic and has tablets which control it. She used to have her chin waxed regulary at a home salon until earlier this year when the therapist closed her business. Since then she has been going to another salon in the area to have it done. When she went last month it had been taken over by someone else, and the same therapist who usually did the waxing, got her to fill a consultation card, then refused to do the treatment because shes slightly diabetic (even though she had done it before). She didnt give a reason why she waxing cant be done on diabetics, she just said she couldnt do it.

I was just wondering what reasons for not doing diabetics were and if it makes a difference if they are slightly or servere diabetic?
 

Nicifer_noonoo

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The reason why diabetes is a contraindication is because diabetics often suffer with lessened sensation. Pain is the body's way of telling you there's soomething not quite right, and if for example the wax is hot enough to burn the skin, the client might not necessarily be aware of this and therefore say the temperature is okay for them.

Also, diabetics tend to bleed more than non diabetics, and this is something to consider when waxing areas prone to bleeding, such as the under arm or bikini line.

To be on the safe side, I always ask for a GP's note before waxing anyone with diabetes, then proceed with caution.
 

dee

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i wont wax a diabetic, far too risky in my opinion , its what i was taught and i really would rather not have any incidents on my insurance ,
people might think i am over cautious but i would rather be that way to be honest , x
 

Bev Rose

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No from me unless they give me a note from their GP.

The reasons that were given to me that Diabetes is a contraindication is beacuase they have thinner skin and there may be liable to tear, damage their skin. Also, that diabetics take a long time to heal, so would be more suseptible to infections.

HTH x
 

Lil lisa

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I agree with the others although i do regularly wax 2 friends who happen to be diabetic i told them i would do it at their own risk and there have been no problems whatsoever! Definately wouldn't recommend it though L x
 

pure

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I have a client who has diabetes and after a thorough consultation I do now wax her eye brows.

She had been going to a different salon which has recently closed so she came to me.

After the consultation I also did a skin sensitivity test and then ensured that she also signed the record card.

I was perfectly happy to carry on with the treatment and she has had no adverse reactions at all.
 

Axiom

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Here are some links to a few threads on this very topic which you may find interesting:

http://www.salongeek.com/skin-geek/60049-diabetes-waxing.html

http://www.salongeek.com/skin-geek/57876-lesson-learnt.html

http://www.salongeek.com/skin-geek/56986-interesting-article-about-waxing.html

I regularly wax clients who have their diabetes under control with exercise, diet or medication. This echoes the advice of Diabetes UK, who have gone on record by stating that there is usually no reason not to wax someone with diabetes. They do suggest that a GP's referral is advisable in extreme cases i.e. where the area to be treated is affected by neuropathy (nerve damage), but as of yet I've never come across this - the vast majority of folks with diabetes will have it under control.

I do feel there is a lot of unnecessary fear and misinformation around this condition, which is understandable if you are taught it's a no-no at college. But providing proper care is taken of the skin during treatment (which should be the same for all clients anyway), I see no reason not to treat. Everyone has to work within their own comfort zone, however :)
 

gillian w

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Here are some links to a few threads on this very topic which you may find interesting:

http://www.salongeek.com/skin-geek/60049-diabetes-waxing.html

http://www.salongeek.com/skin-geek/57876-lesson-learnt.html

http://www.salongeek.com/skin-geek/56986-interesting-article-about-waxing.html

I regularly wax clients who have their diabetes under control with exercise, diet or medication. This echoes the advice of Diabetes UK, who have gone on record by stating that there is usually no reason not to wax someone with diabetes. They do suggest that a GP's referral is advisable in extreme cases i.e. where the area to be treated is affected by neuropathy (nerve damage), but as of yet I've never come across this - the vast majority of folks with diabetes will have it under control.

I do feel there is a lot of unnecessary fear and misinformation around this condition, which is understandable if you are taught it's a no-no at college. But providing proper care is taken of the skin during treatment (which should be the same for all clients anyway), I see no reason not to treat. Everyone has to work within their own comfort zone, however :)
I totally agree
 

Mrs.Clooney

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Here are some links to a few threads on this very topic which you may find interesting:

http://www.salongeek.com/skin-geek/60049-diabetes-waxing.html

http://www.salongeek.com/skin-geek/57876-lesson-learnt.html

http://www.salongeek.com/skin-geek/56986-interesting-article-about-waxing.html

I regularly wax clients who have their diabetes under control with exercise, diet or medication. This echoes the advice of Diabetes UK, who have gone on record by stating that there is usually no reason not to wax someone with diabetes. They do suggest that a GP's referral is advisable in extreme cases i.e. where the area to be treated is affected by neuropathy (nerve damage), but as of yet I've never come across this - the vast majority of folks with diabetes will have it under control.

I do feel there is a lot of unnecessary fear and misinformation around this condition, which is understandable if you are taught it's a no-no at college. But providing proper care is taken of the skin during treatment (which should be the same for all clients anyway), I see no reason not to treat. Everyone has to work within their own comfort zone, however :)
My tutor says that waxing a stable diet controlled diabetic is acceptable if the therapist feels comfortable doing so. She has her own small part time salon attached to a hospital and much of her clientele is either elderly, diabetic, partially paralyzed etc....

Her point was that sometimes, clients feel excluded from having beauty treatments if they have a possible contraindication. Everybody loves a bit of pampering and if the client is happy and the therapist feels comfortable to proceed, then good common sense along with knowledge should allow the treatment to go ahead.

I thought this to be great sensible advise and agree with you on this Axiom.
 

gillian w

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My tutor says that waxing a stable diet controlled diabetic is acceptable if the therapist feels comfortable doing so. She has her own small part time salon attached to a hospital and much of her clientele is either elderly, diabetic, partially paralyzed etc....

Her point was that sometimes, clients feel excluded from having beauty treatments if they have a possible contraindication. Everybody loves a bit of pampering and if the client is happy and the therapist feels comfortable to proceed, then good common sense along with knowledge should allow the treatment to go ahead.

I thought this to be great sensible advise and agree with you on this Axiom.
Then you have a very good tutor.It makes me cross when i hear you can't treat this person and that person ,one of the worst ones is people with cancer they arnt supposed to have one of the best things for them..massage. and if any one needs one its them...Common sense prevails.
 

BABSann

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Andy and Gill I agree,nothing further for me to write really.:green:
 

Chameleon

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Just to reiterate what Andy says and work in your comfort zone.

back home massage is also a common thing to practise for clients that have cancer conditions....but in The UK it is a definite no we learn at college.

If someone is diabetic more often than not they know what level of diabetes they have...and im one of them:)
 

Susie H

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The words here are common sense and contra indication
Common sense says you look at each persons needs
contra indication says that you need to adjust your treatments to suit each persons needs not treat them as if they have leprosies
So perhaps its time that instead of saying my teacher told me this or that what we need to do is find out the facts about the condition and act accordingly. As Andy has already said the best place to get answers is diabetics uk or ring up your doctor and ask to speak with the diabetic nurse.
There are a few threads on here that deal with the myths surrounding this condition and I'm glad to see so many peeps answering so positively this time:hug:
 

Lil Linz

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Thanks for replying. I think what annoyed her most was the salon never bothered to ask her before, its just this time they did a consultation card and refused.
I have read the links and found them quite interesting. I will pass the info onto her, hopefully she will be able to find someone else in the area to do it (shes had no luck so far).

xx
 

huberella

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Here are some links to a few threads on this very topic which you may find interesting:

http://www.salongeek.com/skin-geek/60049-diabetes-waxing.html

http://www.salongeek.com/skin-geek/57876-lesson-learnt.html

http://www.salongeek.com/skin-geek/56986-interesting-article-about-waxing.html

I regularly wax clients who have their diabetes under control with exercise, diet or medication. This echoes the advice of Diabetes UK, who have gone on record by stating that there is usually no reason not to wax someone with diabetes. They do suggest that a GP's referral is advisable in extreme cases i.e. where the area to be treated is affected by neuropathy (nerve damage), but as of yet I've never come across this - the vast majority of folks with diabetes will have it under control.

I do feel there is a lot of unnecessary fear and misinformation around this condition, which is understandable if you are taught it's a no-no at college. But providing proper care is taken of the skin during treatment (which should be the same for all clients anyway), I see no reason not to treat. Everyone has to work within their own comfort zone, however :)

You beat me to it Andy!!! LOL. I have no problem waxing a diabetic... as long as they have it under control. If we didn't wax every person that our text books claim has a contrindicator, then we would not have a lot of clients. We need to pay close attention to each client as an individual. Check the elasticity of their skin, etc, and make a decision to wax or not to wax from our findings... not because a book says "don't wax a diabetic (just an example).
 

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